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Gobiomorphus alpinus

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA ACTINOPTERYGII PERCIFORMES ELEOTRIDAE

Scientific Name: Gobiomorphus alpinus
Species Authority: Stokell, 1962
Common Name(s):
English Tarndale Bully
Taxonomic Notes: This species is genetically indistinguishable from common bully but defined on the basis of morphological differences (Smith et. al., 2003; McDowall and Stevens 2007).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2014
Date Assessed: 2014-07-16
Assessor(s): Ling, N., David, B., Franklin, P., Allibone, R, Closs, G., Crow, S. & West, D
Reviewer(s): Hitchmough, R. & Gibson, C.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Gibson, C. & Buley, K.
Justification:
The Tarndale Bully (Gobiomorhus alpinus) is endemic to New Zealand where it occurs in five small remote sub-alpine lakes in the headwaters of the Clarence and Wairau Rivers, Marlborough in the northern central South Island. The lakes are situated at an altitude of approximately 1,050 m above sea level and are all within three kilometres of each other. Although this small, non-diadromous species is naturally rare, it is abundant throughout its limited range and the population is thought to be stable. This species is listed nationally listed as 'At risk - naturally uncommon'. However it is reasonably well protected by its remoteness and the area in which it occurs is governed by the New Zealand Department of Conservation. Brown Trout (Salmo trutta) have been stocked in some of the the lakes for decades however there is a recreational fishery for this species, which limits the population. Whilst there is no obvious impact on the population of G. alpinus, this species does appear to be more abundant in the lakes without trout. The population may experience decline should trout ever get into any more of the lakes and this should be monitored. Catchment impacts are minor (low intensity, high country pastoral) and there is no public access to the lakes other than by foot so the risk of invasion by other invasive fish or weeds is low. Although this species is restricted to five lakes with a total area of occupancy (AOO) calculated at 0.59 km2, it is considered that there is no real likelihood of plausible future threats significantly affecting this species and it therefore assessed as Least Concern.
History:
1996 Vulnerable
1994 Rare (Groombridge 1994)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: The Tarndale Bully (Gobiomorhus alpinus) is endemic to New Zealand where it occurs in five small remote sub-alpine lakes in the headwaters of the Clarence and Wairau Rivers, Marlborough in the northern central South Island (McDowall 1990, 1994, NIWA 2013).
Countries:
Native:
New Zealand (North Is., South Is.)
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: This species is naturally rare, however it is abundant throughout its remarkably limited range and the population is thought to be stable (NZFFD 2011).
Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species occurs around the margins of five small shallow alpine lakes situated at approximately 1,050 m above sea level, all within three kilometres of each other. It is a small (maximum total length 75 mm) non-diadromous fish (McDowall 1994). Much of the life history of this species is unknown; however it is expected to be similar if not identical to populations of land-locked Common Bully (Gobiomorphus cotidanus).
Systems: Freshwater

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This species is not utilized.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): This species occurs over a very small range (five small lakes within three kilometres of each other) making it inherently vulnerable. Brown Trout (Salmo trutta) have been stocked in some of the the lakes for decades however there is a recreational fishery for this species, which limits the population. Whilst there is no obvious impact on the population of G. alpinus, this species does appear to be more abundant in the lakes without trout. The population may experience decline should trout ever get into any more of the lakes. Catchment impacts are minor (low intensity, high country pastoral) and there is no public access to the lakes other than by foot so the risk of invasion by other invasive fish or weeds is low.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species is nationally listed as 'At risk - Naturally Uncommon' according to the New Zealand Department of Conservation's threat classification system (Goodman et al. 2014). There are no specific conservation measures in place, however the species is restricted to a remote area, which is governed by the New Zealand Department of Conservation.

Citation: Ling, N., David, B., Franklin, P., Allibone, R, Closs, G., Crow, S. & West, D 2014. Gobiomorphus alpinus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 22 December 2014.
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