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Furcifer minor

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA REPTILIA SQUAMATA CHAMAELEONIDAE

Scientific Name: Furcifer minor
Species Authority: (Günther, 1879)
Common Name(s):
English Lesser Chameleon
Synonym(s):
Brookesia minor (Günther, 1879)
Chamaeleon minor Günther, 1879

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Endangered B1ab(iii) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2011
Date Assessed: 2009-12-31
Assessor(s): Jenkins, R.K.B., Andreone, F., Andriamazava, A., Anjeriniaina, M., Brady, L., Glaw, F., Griffiths, R.A., Rabibisoa, N., Rakotomalala, D., Rakotondravony, H., Randrianantoandro, J.C., Randrianiriana, J., Randrianizahana , H., Ratsoavina, F. & Robsomanitrandrasana, E.
Reviewer(s): Bowles, P. & Tolley, K.
Justification:
Listed as Endangered as the species has a range of around 3,900 km² in the south-central highlands of Madagascar. Although the species occurs in plantations and villages, its native Tapia forest habitat is being lost due to logging and is severely fragmented by large patches of savanna grassland.
History:
1996 Vulnerable

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is endemic to Madagascar, where it appears to be restricted to the south-central highlands around Itremo and Ambatofinandrahana (Brygoo 1971, Glaw and Vences 2007, Randrianantoandro et al. 2010). Records from Betafo and Ambositra are old (Brygoo 1971) and recent surveys have not recorded this chameleon there (Randrianantoandro et al. 2010). The lizard has an estimated elevational range of 1,100-1,690 m asl., and an extent of occurrence of 3,900 km².
Countries:
Native:
Madagascar
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: This species has been recorded as being abundant in both undisturbed and disturbed (orchards and coffee plantations) habitats. Randrianantoandro et al. (2010) recorded a density estimate 16.4 individuals per ha at a site that included both disturbed and undisturbed habitats. Although tolerant of some habitat modification, the species may still be declining as a result of forest loss throughout its range. Due to the patchy nature of its forest habitat within a savannah landscape it is presumed to occur as a severely fragmented population.
Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: It has been recorded from Tapia forest, which is a dry forest dominated by Uapaca bojeri (Randrianantoandro et al. 2010). It has also been found in coffee plantations and in orchards in Itremo, and even in villages (Ramanantsoa 1974, Randrianantoandro et al. 2010) and pastureland (R. Jenkins pers. comm. June 2011). However, the habitat in the range of the species is fragmented by large patches of savanna grassland. A dissected female contained 12 eggs and oviposition occurs in April (Glaw and Vences 2007).
Systems: Terrestrial

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: 2,313 individuals of this species were exported from Madagascar before the 1994 trade suspension. Seven individuals were recorded in illegal trade in a survey in Thailand in January 2010.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s):

Tapia forest is a relatively rare and declining habitat type in Madagascar. In the Itremo area, the main threats are mining (quartz and tourmaline) and logging for charcoal use. Slash-and-burn agriculture may represent a threat to this species by removing Tapia forest, but further research is needed to clarify whether the resulting farmland represents suitable habitat for this lizard (R. Jenkins pers. comm. June 2011). There is convincing evidence that collection from the wild still occurs around Itremo. The impact of this collection has yet to be studied but is unlikely to be a major threat to populations if highly localized and only involves relatively small quantities of chameleons.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions:

Part of the species' range in Itremo is in the process of being established as a protected area. Survey work is required to determine whether the species may occur more widely, and to clarify its degree of tolerance of habitat modification. Any ongoing commercial collection needs to be monitored and, if it represents a threat to this species, international trade restrictions enforced.


Citation: Jenkins, R.K.B., Andreone, F., Andriamazava, A., Anjeriniaina, M., Brady, L., Glaw, F., Griffiths, R.A., Rabibisoa, N., Rakotomalala, D., Rakotondravony, H., Randrianantoandro, J.C., Randrianiriana, J., Randrianizahana , H., Ratsoavina, F. & Robsomanitrandrasana, E. 2011. Furcifer minor. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 26 July 2014.
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