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Eulemur mongoz 

Scope: Global
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Primates Lemuridae

Scientific Name: Eulemur mongoz
Species Authority: (Linnaeus, 1766)
Common Name(s):
English Mongoose Lemur
French Maki Mongoz, Lémur Mongoz
Spanish Lemur Mangosta
Taxonomic Notes: Generic synonym = Lemur.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Critically Endangered A4cde ver 3.1
Year Published: 2014
Date Assessed: 2012-07-11
Assessor(s): Andriaholinirina, N., Baden, A., Blanco, M., Chikhi, L., Cooke, A., Davies, N., Dolch, R., Donati, G., Ganzhorn, J., Golden, C., Groeneveld, L.F., Hapke, A., Irwin, M., Johnson, S., Kappeler, P., King, T., Lewis, R., Louis, E.E., Markolf, M., Mass, V., Mittermeier, R.A., Nichols, R., Patel, E., Rabarivola, C.J., Raharivololona, B., Rajaobelina, S., Rakotoarisoa, G., Rakotomanga, B., Rakotonanahary, J., Rakotondrainibe, H., Rakotondratsimba, G., Rakotondratsimba, M., Rakotonirina, L., Ralainasolo, F.B., Ralison, J., Ramahaleo, T., Ranaivoarisoa, J.F., Randrianahaleo, S.I., Randrianambinina, B., Randrianarimanana, L., Randrianasolo, H., Randriatahina, G., Rasamimananana, H., Rasolofoharivelo, T., Rasoloharijaona, S., Ratelolahy, F., Ratsimbazafy, J., Ratsimbazafy, N., Razafindraibe, H., Razafindramanana, J., Rowe, N., Salmona, J., Seiler, M., Volampeno, S., Wright, P., Youssouf, J., Zaonarivelo, J. & Zaramody, A.
Reviewer(s): Schwitzer, C. & Molur, S.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Chiozza, F. & Clark, F.
Justification:
There is a suspected population reduction of ≥80% in this species over a three generation period (estimating the generation length to be 8 years). This time period includes both the past and the future. Causes of this reduction (which have not ceased) include continuing decline in area, extent and quality of habitat, and exploitation through unsustainable levels of hunting. Furthermore, E. mongoz has undergone hybridization with E. rufus in Western Betsiboka. Based on these premises, the species is listed as Critically Endangered.
Previously published Red List assessments:

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:

This species is found in northwestern Madagascar and in the Comoros on the islands of Moheli, Anjouan and Grande Comoro, where they were almost certainly introduced by human agency. On Madagascar, it is known from the region of Ambato-Boéni and Ankarafantsika; the northern limit of its distribution appears to be near Analalava on the Bay of Narindra, and it has been seen south and west of the Betsiboka River at Katsepy and on the shores of Lac Kinkony, on both sides of the Mahavavy River and in the Tsiombikibo forest near Mitsinjo (Mittermeier et al. 2008). It ranges from sea level to 400 m. It is sympatric with E. fulvus north of the Betsiboka River, and with E. rufifrons south of it. Mongoose Lemurs have sometimes been observed intermingling with E. fulvus groups during feeding bouts, but usually keep to themselves and are much more cyrptic than the latter species.

Countries occurrence:
Native:
Madagascar
Introduced:
Comoros
Additional data:
Continuing decline in extent of occurrence (EOO):Yes
Upper elevation limit (metres):400
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:

Muller et al. (2000) recorded densities of 16 groups/km2 and 45 individuals/km² in Anjamena, using transect line sampling. In 2008, Shrum (2008) has recorded densities of 2.5 groups/km2 and 10 individuals/km2 in Anjamena using the same methodology. This species is hybridizing with E. rufus in western Betsiboka.

Current Population Trend:Decreasing
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:Yes

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:This species is found in dry deciduous forests and scrub in western Madagascar, more typically in humid forests in the Comoros, and can survive in secondary forest. In Madagascar it lives in small cohesive family units of an adult male-female pair with one to four offspring; larger groups have been recorded on Mohéli in the Comoros. A cathemeral species, it is able to shift from mainly diurnal to mainly nocturnal activity from the wet to the dry season (Curtis et al. 1999). Fruits predominate in the diet with flowers and leaves seasonally significant (Curtis et al. 1999). The birth season appears to be around mid-October on Anjouan and in Madagascar, and females give birth each year to a single offspring, after a 126–128- day gestation period. (Mittermeier et al. 2008, and references therein). Weaning occurs at 6–7 months.
 


Systems:Terrestrial
Continuing decline in area, extent and/or quality of habitat:Yes
Generation Length (years):8

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This species is hunted for food.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s):

Forests of western Madagascar inhabited by mongoose lemurs are already highly fragmented and continue to be cleared due to slash-and-burn agriculture, burning to create pasture for cattle, and charcoal production (Shrum 2008). Hunting using traps is also considered to be a threat. While previously under less threat on Anjouan and Mohéli in the Comoros, this species is now more often regarded as a crop pest, especially by an influx of Malagasy who do not adhere to local customs that have historically provided lemurs in the Comoros a greater degree of protection (Tattersall 1998). The species' legal protection seems to be of little use.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions:

This species is listed on Appendix I of CITES. It is protected by law in the Comoros. It is known to occur in the protected areas of Ankarafantsika National Park (Ampijoroa) and the Mahavavy-Kinkony Wetland Complex (Anjamena, Analabe, Analamanitra, Ankamangoa, Bemahazaka, Tsilaiza, Anoloky, Tsimbokibo and Anoborengy) while unprotected populations are found in the forests of Antrema (at Katsepy) and Mariarano (Mittermeier et al. 2008, Muller et al. 2000, Shrum 2008). The highest densities of the species are found in the Mahavavy-Kinkony Wetland Complex where high rates of deforestation are causing fragmentation within the already very small fragments. The species does not appear to move between fragments and seems limited to only the largest of the remaining forest patches (Shrum 2008). As of 2009, there were 111 mongoose lemurs in zoological collections worldwide (ISIS 2009).

Attention is quickly needed toward the enforcement of the remaining large fragments within the Mahavavy-Kinkony Wetland Complex as the last of the viable habitat for the species is quickly being further fragmented.


Citation: Andriaholinirina, N., Baden, A., Blanco, M., Chikhi, L., Cooke, A., Davies, N., Dolch, R., Donati, G., Ganzhorn, J., Golden, C., Groeneveld, L.F., Hapke, A., Irwin, M., Johnson, S., Kappeler, P., King, T., Lewis, R., Louis, E.E., Markolf, M., Mass, V., Mittermeier, R.A., Nichols, R., Patel, E., Rabarivola, C.J., Raharivololona, B., Rajaobelina, S., Rakotoarisoa, G., Rakotomanga, B., Rakotonanahary, J., Rakotondrainibe, H., Rakotondratsimba, G., Rakotondratsimba, M., Rakotonirina, L., Ralainasolo, F.B., Ralison, J., Ramahaleo, T., Ranaivoarisoa, J.F., Randrianahaleo, S.I., Randrianambinina, B., Randrianarimanana, L., Randrianasolo, H., Randriatahina, G., Rasamimananana, H., Rasolofoharivelo, T., Rasoloharijaona, S., Ratelolahy, F., Ratsimbazafy, J., Ratsimbazafy, N., Razafindraibe, H., Razafindramanana, J., Rowe, N., Salmona, J., Seiler, M., Volampeno, S., Wright, P., Youssouf, J., Zaonarivelo, J. & Zaramody, A. 2014. Eulemur mongoz. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2014: e.T8202A16117799. . Downloaded on 28 September 2016.
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