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Plestiodon laticeps 

Scope: Global
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Reptilia Squamata Scincidae

Scientific Name: Plestiodon laticeps (Schneider, 1801)
Common Name(s):
English Broad-headed Skink, Broadhead Skink
Synonym(s):
Eumeces laticeps (Schneider, 1801)
Scincus laticeps Schneider, 1801
Taxonomic Notes: In a phylogenetic analysis of Eumeces based on morphology, Griffith et al. (2000) proposed splitting Eumeces into multiple genera, based on the apparent paraphyly of Eumeces. Smith (2005) and Brandley et al. (2005) formally proposed that all North American species (north of Mexico) be placed in the genus Plestiodon. This was accepted by Crother (2008) and Collins and Taggart (2009).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2007
Date Assessed: 2007-03-01
Assessor(s): Hammerson, G.A.
Reviewer(s): Cox, N., Chanson, J.S. & Stuart, S.N. (Global Reptile Assessment Coordinating Team)
Justification:
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a degree of habitat modification, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species occurs widely in the southeastern United States, avoiding much of the Appalachian Mountains. Its range extends from southeastern Pennsylvania, central Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, and eastern Kanas south to eastern Texas, the Gulf Coast, and central Florida. An isolated population may occur in northeastern Indiana (record could represent an atypical E. fasciatus juvenile; Minton 2001 ). Isolated questionable records exist west of established range in western Oklahoma and central Texas, and to the south in southern Florida (Cooper 1988).
Countries occurrence:
Native:
United States
Additional data:
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:This species is represented by a very large number of occurrences or subpopulations. Cooper (1988) mapped hundred of collections sites rangewide, and Palmer and Braswell (1995) mapped well over 100 sites in North Carolina alone. The total adult population size is unknown but probably exceeds 100,000. Population trends are not well documented, but extent of occurrence, area of occupancy, number of subpopulations, and populations size are probably stable or slowly declining.
Current Population Trend:Stable
Additional data:

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:Rangewide, the species occupies wooded areas and woodland edges having diverse soil types and moisture conditions; hammocks and cypress heads in Florida; also swamps, vacant debris-strewn lots, and barrier islands. These lizards are semi-arboreal and often sun themselves on snags or stumps; they take refuge in rotting stumps and standing dead trees, occupying old woodpecker holes and other hollows. On coastal islands in South Carolina, they prefer large live oaks having holes and a fringe of dense cover (bushes) (Cooper 1993); adults occur most often in oaks or on the ground, juveniles occur most often on walls, palmettos, or on the ground; they may actively avoid pines (Cooper and Vitt 1994). Eggs are laid in a nest in a rotting stump or dead tree or under rocks or other cover.
Systems:Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): No major threats have been identified. The species is tolerant of moderate habitat alteration (e.g., logging, partial clearing, nonintensive rural residential development).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Many protected areas include populations of this lizard.

Citation: Hammerson, G.A. 2007. Plestiodon laticeps. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2007: e.T64231A12756745. . Downloaded on 20 November 2017.
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