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Phyllopetalia pudu

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA ARTHROPODA INSECTA ODONATA AUSTROPETALIIDAE

Scientific Name: Phyllopetalia pudu
Species Authority: (Dunkle, 1985)
Common Name(s):
English Pudu Redspot
Synonym(s):
Ophiopetalia araucana Carle, 1996
Ophiopetalia auregaster Carle, 1996
Ophiopetalia diana Carle, 1996
Ophiopetalia pudu Carle, 1996

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2009
Date Assessed: 2006-12-09
Assessor(s): von Ellenrieder, N.
Reviewer(s): Clausnitzer, V. & Paulson, D. (Odonata Red List Authority)
Justification:
Extent of occurrence of over 101,500 km² and known from more than 20 locations, seemingly common species. Populations in northern and western parts of range likely threatened by human activity, but eastern and southern populations protected by presence in natural parks (including Parques Nacionales Tolhuaca, Lanín, Nahuel Huapi, Los Alerces; Muzón and von Ellenrieder 1999).
History:
2006 Data Deficient (IUCN 2006)
2006 Data Deficient

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Occurs in central third of Chile, in Metropolitana, Bío-Bío, Araucania, and De Los Lagos regions, and western portion of Neuquen, Rio Negro and Chubut provinces in Argentina (von Ellenrieder 2005).
Countries:
Native:
Argentina; Chile
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: The species appears to be common as it is found in over 20 locations.
Population Trend: Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: Upper end of small forested stream valleys. Carle (1996) indicated that larvae are typically found in streams less than 50 cm wide, under rocks and logs, wet or submerged. Larvae remain undescribed. Carle (1996) also reported that the majority of specimens of this species were collected while flying in a slightly undulating fashion at 0.3-1.5 m along forest paths near the upper end of small forested stream valleys. According to G. Fleck (pers. comm. 2004) the species flies only while the sun is shining; he observed male flight as linear, somewhat undulating vertically, rather fast and unidirectional over small rapid mountain streams, and one female flying rather fast, with some zigzags, 2-2.5 m above the stream, in a circular path returning to the same point after a few seconds. Known flight period extends from November to February (von Ellenrieder 2005).
Systems: Freshwater

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Mining, grazing, recreational development, diversion of streams and springs for irrigation, and deforestation (Carle 2005).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Populations in northern and western parts of range very likely threatened by human activity; eastern and southern populations protected by presence in natural parks (i.e. Parques Nacionales Tolhuaca, Lanín, Nahuel Huapi, Los Alerces; Muzón and von Ellenrieder 1999).

Citation: von Ellenrieder, N. 2009. Phyllopetalia pudu. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 22 December 2014.
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