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Epicrionops niger 

Scope:Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_onStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Amphibia Gymnophiona Rhinatrematidae

Scientific Name: Epicrionops niger
Species Authority: (Dunn, 1942)
Common Name(s):
English Black Caecilian
Spanish Cecilia Negra
Synonym(s):
Rhinatrema nigrum Dunn, 1942
Taxonomic Source(s): Frost, D.R. 2013. Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 5.6 (9 January 2013). Electronic Database. American Museum of Natural History, New York, USA. Available at: http://research.amnh.org/herpetology/amphibia/index.html.
Taxonomic Notes: The species is sometimes incorrectly cited as Epicrionops nigrus. The taxonomy of the genus is in need of revision (M. Wilkinson pers. comm.).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2004
Date Assessed: 2004-04-30
Annotations:
Needs updating
Assessor(s): Marinus Hoogmoed, Robert Reynolds, Mark Wilkinson, Marvalee Wake
Reviewer(s): Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson, Neil Cox and Bruce Young)
Justification:
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is known from western Guyana and south-eastern Venezuela at between 100 and 1,700m asl. It probably ranges more widely than is currently known.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Guyana; Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: The population status of this species is unknown. It is currently known only from four specimens (Marvalee Wake pers. comm.).
Current Population Trend: Unknown
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented: No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: It inhabits cloud forests, seasonally dry forests, and marshland areas. The females guard the eggs, which are laid terrestrially under cover, such as rocks. The larvae presumably develop in streams. Its ability to adapt to secondary habitats is not known.
Systems: Terrestrial; Freshwater

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): It occurs in an area of very limited human impact, and it is therefore unlikely to be significantly threatened.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It occurs in the Canaima National Park, Venezuela.

Citation: Marinus Hoogmoed, Robert Reynolds, Mark Wilkinson, Marvalee Wake. 2004. Epicrionops niger. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2004: e.T59643A11975214. . Downloaded on 30 May 2016.
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