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Occidozyga laevis

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA AMPHIBIA ANURA DICROGLOSSIDAE

Scientific Name: Occidozyga laevis
Species Authority: (Günther, 1858)
Common Name(s):
English Common Puddle Frog, Puddle Frog, Yellow Bellied Puddle Frog
Taxonomic Notes: New evidence from the field suggests that this taxon might be comprised of several valid species.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2004
Date Assessed: 2004-04-30
Assessor(s): Arvin Diesmos, Angel Alcala, Rafe Brown, Leticia Afuang, Genevieve Gee, Jeet Sukumaran, Norsham Yaakob, Leong Tzi Ming, Yodchaiy Chuaynkern, Kumthorn Thirakhupt, Indraneil Das, Djoko Iskandar, Mumpuni, Robert Inger, Robert Stuebing, Paul Yambun, Maklarin Lakim
Reviewer(s): Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson and Neil Cox)
Justification:
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is found in Peninsular Thailand including Phuket (Taylor, 1962, Frith, 1977), Peninsular Malaysia (Berry, 1975, Dring, 1979, Kiew, 1987 and Manthey and Grossmann, 1997), Singapore (Lim and Lim, 1992), Borneo, Pulau Bajau, Anambas Islands and Natuna Besar (Indonesia) and all the major islands in the Philippines. Records from mainland Southeast Asia (Viet Nam, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Cambodia, monsoon Thailand) are attributed to Occidozyga martensii for this assessment. However taxonomic questions regarding this species might alter this distribution. It is not known from high altitudes (Dring, 1979).
Countries:
Native:
Brunei Darussalam; Indonesia; Malaysia; Philippines; Singapore; Thailand
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: In Peninsular Southeast Asia this is generally a common to abundant species in appropriate habitat. In the Philippines it is also abundant and common.
Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: In Peninsular Southeast Asia this species inhabits shallow muddy puddles and pools near small forest streams, and is occasionally found in gentle stream sections and is apparently purely aquatic. It is a species of the forest edge, but not a human commensal of strongly disturbed or dynamic areas. In the Philippines it is found in anthropogenic habitats in the lowlands and occasionally in undisturbed lower montane and lowland forests. In Borneo this species is most often seen in marshy areas, small puddles and small streams in lowland rainforest. Tadpoles have been seen most often in marshes on the peninsula and in any standing body of available water in the Philippines.
Systems: Terrestrial; Freshwater

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): In the Philippines, available information indicates that this species is not subjected to any significant degree of disturbance, which could threaten its survival. In Peninsular Southeast Asia the species could potentially be threatened by major forest impacts, or canopy opening drying out the forest floor. In Borneo, deforestation, with the resultant restriction and fragmentation of habitat, is probably the main threat to this species.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: In the Philippines, based on present information, no conservation measures are needed for this species in the immediate future. In Peninsular Southeast Asia it is widespread and confirmed from several protected areas (Kiew, 1987, Manthey and Grossmann, 1997) in Thailand and Malaysia, and no conservation action appears warranted at present. In Borneo the protection of lowland forests in Sabah and parts of Sarawak now provide stable habitats for this species.

Citation: Arvin Diesmos, Angel Alcala, Rafe Brown, Leticia Afuang, Genevieve Gee, Jeet Sukumaran, Norsham Yaakob, Leong Tzi Ming, Yodchaiy Chuaynkern, Kumthorn Thirakhupt, Indraneil Das, Djoko Iskandar, Mumpuni, Robert Inger, Robert Stuebing, Paul Yambun, Maklarin Lakim 2004. Occidozyga laevis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 16 September 2014.
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