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Hyla versicolor

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA AMPHIBIA ANURA HYLIDAE

Scientific Name: Hyla versicolor
Species Authority: LeConte, 1825
Common Name(s):
English Gray Treefrog
Taxonomic Notes: This species is not distinguished from the very similar Hyla chrysoscelis in most published literature; it is distinguished by chromosomes, erythrocyte size (Matson 1990), and call characteristics.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2014
Date Assessed: 2014-08-07
Assessor(s): IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group
Reviewer(s): Luedtke, J.
Contributor(s): Hammerson, G.A. & Pelletier, S.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Angulo, A.
Justification:
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a degree of habitat modification and presumed large population.
History:
2004 Least Concern

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species' geographic range is not precisely determined, although it covers much of the eastern USA and southeastern Canada. It is sympatric with Hyla chrysoscelis in Wisconsin, south-central U.S., and probably many other areas. See Little et al. (1989) for distribution in West Virginia, southern Ohio, and southwestern Pennsylvania. See McAlpine et al. (1991) for information on distribution in eastern Maine and southwestern New Brunswick.
Countries:
Native:
Canada (Manitoba, New Brunswick, Ontario, Québec); United States (Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin)
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: The total adult population size is unknown but it is abundant and probably stable.
Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: It inhabits various kinds of wooded and forested habitats. It is both arboreal and terrestrial. It hides in tree holes, under bark, in rotten logs, under leaves and under tree roots when inactive. Eggs and larvae develop in shallow woodland ponds and marshes, puddles, ponds in forest clearings, swamps, bogs and many other kinds of permanent or temporary waters lacking a significant current, including ponds created through excavation by humans. In northern Minnesota, successful reproduction in acidic bog water either does not occur or is a rare event (Karns 1992). In central Ontario, embryos and larvae exhibited high degree of acid tolerance (J. Herpetol. 26:1-6).
Systems: Terrestrial; Freshwater

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade:

It is found in the pet trade.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Introduced bluegill sunfish might cause declines in larval tree frog abundance (Smith et al. 1999).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Its range overlaps with many protected areas. No conservation measures are needed.

Citation: IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group 2014. Hyla versicolor. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 27 November 2014.
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