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Dryophytes squirellus 

Scope: Global
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Amphibia Anura Hylidae

Scientific Name: Dryophytes squirellus
Species Authority: (Bosc, 1800)
Common Name(s):
English Squirrel Treefrog
Synonym(s):
Hyla squirella Bosc, 1800
Taxonomic Source(s): Frost, D.R. 2017. Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0 (10 March 2017). American Museum of Natural History, New York, USA Available at: http://research.amnh.org/herpetology/amphibia/index.html.
Taxonomic Notes: The genus Dryophytes was resurrected from synonymy under Hyla by Duellman et al. (2016) and this species was transferred from Hyla to Dryophytes.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2017
Date Assessed: 2004-04-30
Annotations:
Needs updating
Assessor(s): Hammerson, G.A. & Hedges, B.
Reviewer(s): Stuart, S.N., Chanson, J.S., Cox, N.A. & Young, B.E.
Justification:
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species is known from Coastal Plain of the eastern USA from southeastern Virginia to Florida Keys, west to southeastern Texas (Conant and Collins, 1991). There are isolated occurrences in Mississippi, North Carolina, and northern Virginia. It is introduced on Grand Bahama Island and Little Bahama Bank (Schwartz and Henderson, 1991).
Countries occurrence:
Native:
United States
Introduced:
Bahamas
Additional data:
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:Often abundant, these species populations are likely to be stable.
Current Population Trend:Stable
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:Open woods, cities, and towns; thick low vegetation near water; wherever there is adequate moisture, hiding places, nearby standing water, and insect food. When inactive, hides under loose bark, palm leaves, in tree holes, in gardens, and in other protected sites. There is a non-breeding "rain call" given by males from trees and bushes when rainfall is impending. Eggs and larvae develop in flooded roadside ditches, flat woods ponds, swamps, and small, semi permanent stock-watering ponds. Males call from debris and twigs above water, on ground near water, or hidden in grass clumps adjacent to permanent or temporary rain pools of moderate depth (Schwartz and Henderson 1991).
Systems:Terrestrial; Freshwater

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): There are no major pervasive threats. It adapts to moderate habitat disturbance.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: There are no conservation measures needed.

Citation: Hammerson, G.A. & Hedges, B. 2017. Dryophytes squirellus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2017: e.T55662A112715025. . Downloaded on 24 May 2017.
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