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Hemisus microscaphus 

Scope: Global
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Amphibia Anura Hemisotidae

Scientific Name: Hemisus microscaphus Laurent, 1972
Common Name(s):
English Ethiopian Snout-burrower, Lake Zwai Snout-burrower
Taxonomic Source(s): Frost, D.R. 2013. Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 5.6 (9 January 2013). Electronic Database. American Museum of Natural History, New York, USA. Available at: http://research.amnh.org/herpetology/amphibia/index.html.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2013
Date Assessed: 2013-06-19
Assessor(s): IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group
Reviewer(s): Stuart, S.N.
Contributor(s): Largen, M.J.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Morris, E.J.
Justification:
Listed as Least Concern in view of its relatively wide distribution and presumed large population.
Previously published Red List assessments:

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species is endemic to the highlands of southwestern and western Ethiopia at 1,500-2,700 m asl.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Ethiopia
Additional data:
Lower elevation limit (metres):1500
Upper elevation limit (metres):2700
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:It seems to be relatively common in a number of different habitats.
Current Population Trend:Unknown
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:It is typically found in montane grassland, but penetrates at least marginally into tropical deciduous forest and into somewhat arid savannah. It is usually found in marshy situations, and in the vicinity of streams. It is a fossorial species, generally living underground except when breeding. The eggs are presumably laid in subterranean nests in which the tadpoles hatch, and from where they subsequently move into water to develop. Larval development has been confirmed in a small, semi-permanent pool, and has been suspected in a small river.
Systems:Terrestrial; Freshwater

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade:

There are no reports of this species being utilized.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The main threat is environmental degradation as a result of human settlement and expansion.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It is not known from any protected areas.

Citation: IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group. 2013. Hemisus microscaphus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2013: e.T55282A18361298. . Downloaded on 15 August 2018.
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