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Pteralopex taki

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA MAMMALIA CHIROPTERA PTEROPODIDAE

Scientific Name: Pteralopex taki
Species Authority: Parnaby, 2002
Common Name(s):
English New Georgia Monkey-faced Bat, New Georgian Monkey-faced Bat

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Endangered B1ab(ii,iii) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2008
Date Assessed: 2008-06-30
Assessor(s): Hamilton, S., Helgen, K., James, R., Fisher, D. & Parnaby, H.
Reviewer(s): Lamoreux, J. (Global Mammal Assessment Team), Racey, P.A., Medellín, R. & Hutson, A.M. (Chiroptera Red List Authority)
Justification:
Listed as Endangered, because its extent of occurrence of less than 5,000 km2, its distribution is severely fragmented, and there is a continuing decline in the area of occupancy and in the extent and quality of its forest habitat. The decline in habitat is rapid and the species is also likely to be threatened by increased hunting in the future. It already has been extirpated from one of the three islands from where it is known.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is restricted to the islands of New Georgia and Vangunu in the Solomon Islands. It is presumed to have become extinct on the island of Kolombangara in the mid-1970s (Flannery 1995; Parnaby 2002).
Countries:
Native:
Solomon Islands
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: Uncommon. This species was the 9th most frequently netted out of 12 species of bats captured in a targeted study of the species on New Georgia by Fisher and Tasker (1997). It comprised 6% of captures. In ideal habitat (mature lowland forest close to stands of fruit trees, e.g., old village sites) population density estimated from the resighting rate of radio-collared bats over three months was around 3 per km2, and around 0.15 per km2 in primary forest.

Population size inferred from the probable area of suitable habitat is around 500 mature individuals (min = 130, max = 5,000) (D. Fisher pers. comm.).
Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species appears to need a core range of mature lowland tropical moist forest containing large old trees. It usually flies below, rather than above, canopy level (Fisher and Tasker 1997). It appears to forage in old gardens and historical village-sites with large fig, Ngali (Canarium sp.) and Cut Nut trees (Barringtonia edulis), close to primary tropical moist forest (Flannery 1995). Animals roost in small colonies within hollow trees, particularly figs with a diameter of over 1.5 m (Fisher and Tasker 1997). Parnaby (2002) estimated the generation length of this species to be between eight and ten years.
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The species is threatened by habitat loss through logging operations and land clearance; it is also adversely affected by the conversion of land for agriculture, especially for oil palm plantations. It is particularly threatened by the removal of large roost trees (Parnaby 2002). The species is believed to have become extinct on Kolombangara because of extensive logging operations between 1966 and 1980 (Flannery 1995; Parnaby 2002). There is some local hunting of this species, and while it is currently not intensively hunted, the hunting pressure on this species is predicted to rise with the increasing human population of the Solomon Islands (Flannery 1995; Parnaby 2002). It occurs in accessible areas near coastal villages, and is easily caught (Fisher and Tasker 1997).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Pteralopex taki is not present in any protected areas. Research is urgently needed to determine the impact of logging on it. Protection of suitable lowland forest habitat is urgently needed to conserve this species.

Citation: Hamilton, S., Helgen, K., James, R., Fisher, D. & Parnaby, H. 2008. Pteralopex taki. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 02 October 2014.
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