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Lipaugus uropygialis

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA AVES PASSERIFORMES COTINGIDAE

Scientific Name: Lipaugus uropygialis
Species Authority: Sclater & Salvin, 1876
Common Name(s):
English Scimitar-winged Piha
Synonym(s):
Chirocylla uropygialis uropygialis BirdLife International (2004)
Chirocylla uropygialis uropygialis Stotz et al. (1996)

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Vulnerable B1ab(i,ii,iii,v);C2a(i) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2012
Date Assessed: 2012-05-01
Assessor(s): BirdLife International
Reviewer(s): Symes, A. & Butchart, S.
Contributor(s): Balderama, J., Gallick, T., Hennessey, A., Herzog, S., Kessler, M., Remsen, J., Ridgely, R., Rossouw, J., Schulenberg, T., Walker, B. & Woods, B.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Benstead, P., O'Brien, A., Sharpe, C J, Stuart, T., Symes, A., Temple, H.
Justification:
This species is listed as Vulnerable because it is known from only a few locations and has a small range, which is declining owing to habitat clearance and fragmentation.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Lipaugus uropygialis is confined to the subtropical Yungas (east slopes of the Andes) of central and west Bolivia (eight known localities in Cochabamba and La Paz) and south-east Peru (Abra de Maracunca, Puno and Alto Urubamba, Cusco) (Remsen et al. 1982, B. Hennessey in litt. 1999, Bryce et al. 2005, B. P. Walker in litt. 2007). Recent records from Madidi National Park, La Paz and the north-east side of the Cordillera Cocapata, Cochabamba (Hennessey and Gomez 2003, Bryce et al. 2005) suggest that it occurs in the two largest expanses of previously unexplored Bolivian and Peruvian Upper Yungas. Gaps in its range may reflect observer coverage (J. Balderama, T. Gallick, S. K. Herzog, M. Kessler, R. S. Ridgely, J. Rossouw, T. S. Schulenberg, B. P. Walker and B. Woods per B. Hennessey in litt. 1999), or may be genuine gaps in distribution as in e.g. Southern Helmeted Curassow Crax unicornis (B. Hennessey in litt. 1999). Described as uncommon and local (Snow 1982, Ridgely and Tudor 1994), like other Andean pihas it appears to be a naturally low-density species (J. V. Remsen in litt. 1986).

Countries:
Native:
Bolivia, Plurinational States of; Peru
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: The population is estimated to number 1,000-2,499 individuals based on an assessment of known records, descriptions of abundance and range size. This is consistent with recorded population density estimates for congeners or close relatives with a similar body size, and the fact that only a proportion of the estimated Extent of Occurrence is likely to be occupied. This estimate is equivalent to 667-1,666 mature individuals, rounded here to 600-1,700 mature individuals (J. V. Remsen in litt. 1986).
Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: It occurs in humid, subtropical, montane forest at 1,800-2,750 m (Remsen et al. 1982, J. Balderama, T. Gallick, S. K. Herzog, M. Kessler, R. S. Ridgely, J. Rossouw, T. S. Schulenberg, B. P. Walker and B. Woods per B. Hennessey in litt. 1999). Old-growth forest may be required at some stage in its life-cycle, although it has been seen in degraded forest at the Peruvian site (J. Balderama, T. Gallick, S. K. Herzog, M. Kessler, R. S. Ridgely, J. Rossouw, T. S. Schulenberg, B. P. Walker and B. Woods per B. Hennessey in litt. 1999, B. Hennessey in litt. 1999, Bryce et al. 2005). Within primary forest it is apparently restricted to specific spots, often associated with ridges, suggesting it may have unknown microhabitat requirements and therefore may not occur in all apparently suitable forests within its range (Bryce et al. 2005). It is absent from some areas of former occurrence that have now been affected by forest disturbance associated with road construction (B. Hennessey in litt. 1999). It has been seen accompanying mixed-species flocks (Ridgely and Tudor 1994, J. Balderama, T. Gallick, S. K. Herzog, M. Kessler, R. S. Ridgely, J. Rossouw, T. S. Schulenberg, B. P. Walker and B. Woods per B. Hennessey in litt. 1999). Stomach contents of one specimen comprised berries and fruit (Snow 1982), and it has been recorded eating fruit, flycatching and eating a caterpillar (J. Balderama, T. Gallick, S. K. Herzog, M. Kessler, R. S. Ridgely, J. Rossouw, T. S. Schulenberg, B. P. Walker and B. Woods per B. Hennessey in litt. 1999, B. Hennessey in litt. 1999, Bryce et al. 2005). It is unobtrusive but responds to tape playback (B. P. Walker in litt. 2007). It has been observed in groups of up to four birds, especially when displaying, but appears to be genuinely rare and local even in pristine forest (Bryce et al. 2005, B. P. Walker in litt. 2007).

Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Road construction, low-intensity agriculture, selective logging and, at lower altitudes, clearance for plantations of tea, coffee and coca affect its habitat, although extensive areas of largely undisturbed forest remain (Dinerstein et al. 1995, B. Hennessey in litt. 1999). These threats are likely to increase. Furthermore, the species may require old-growth forest, making selective and small-scale logging a more serious threat than it is to other birds endemic to the Yungas (B. Hennessey in litt. 1999). Areas near the Peruvian locality have been extensively or completely deforested, owing to thousands of years of human land-use (J. Balderama, T. Gallick, S. K. Herzog, M. Kessler, R. S. Ridgely, J. Rossouw, T. S. Schulenberg, B. P. Walker and B. Woods per B. Hennessey in litt. 1999).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Conservation Actions Underway
It has been recorded in the extreme north-west of Carrasco National Park, Cochabamba, in Cotapata National Park, La Paz (B. Hennessey in litt. 1999, J. Balderama, T. Gallick, S. K. Herzog, M. Kessler, R. S. Ridgely, J. Rossouw, T. S. Schulenberg, B. P. Walker and B. Woods per B. Hennessey in litt. 1999) and Alto Urubamba in the newly-created Megantoni National Sanctuary, Cusco, Peru (B. P. Walker in litt. 2007).

Conservation Actions Proposed
Search for new localities and population strongholds, concentrating on Yungas forests of SE Peru and Bolivia at 1,500-3,000 m. Conduct research into habitat requirements and possible seasonal movements (Hennessey and Gomez 2003). Increase the area of suitable habitat that has protected status.


Citation: BirdLife International 2012. Lipaugus uropygialis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.1. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 23 July 2014.
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