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Stephanoaetus coronatus

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA AVES ACCIPITRIFORMES ACCIPITRIDAE

Scientific Name: Stephanoaetus coronatus
Species Authority: (Linnaeus, 1766)
Common Name(s):
English Crowned Eagle, Crowned Hawk-Eagle, Crowned Eagle
French Aigle couronné

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened ver 3.1
Year Published: 2012
Date Assessed: 2012-05-01
Assessor(s): BirdLife International
Reviewer(s): Butchart, S. & Symes, A.
Contributor(s): Baker, N., Cizek, A., Dowsett-Lemaire, F., Ewbank, D., Hall, P., Jones, T., Lindsell, J., Phalan, B., Plumptre, A. & Pomeroy, D.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Butchart, S., Ekstrom, J., Harding, M., Taylor, J.
Justification:
This species has been uplisted to Near Threatened because evidence of widespread threats suggests that its population is in moderately rapid decline.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Stephanoaetus coronatus is a widespread resident of sub-Saharan Africa, occurring in easternmost Sudan and South Sudan, western Ethiopia, southernmost Senegal, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, Liberia, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana and southern Togo, southern Nigeria and Cameroon, through Gabon, into Congo and Democratic Republic of Congo, south to north-western Angola, east to Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania, south-east through Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique, to northern and eastern Zimbabwe, north-eastern, eastern and south-eastern South Africa and Swaziland (Ferguson-Lees and Christie 2001). The species's range in Malawi is regarded as certainly decreasing, and habitat clearance there is expected to be impacting the species (Dowsett-Lemaire and Dowsett 2006). It has also declined in southern Mozambique owing to forest destruction along the coast (Parker 1999). The negative effects of habitat loss in South Africa are regarded as being partly offset by the establishment of exotic plantations (Hockey et al. 2005 and references therein). The species is thought to be in decline overall as a result of a suite of widespread threats, including direct persecution and competition from humans for prey species, in addition to habitat loss.
Countries:
Native:
Angola (Angola); Burundi; Cameroon; Central African Republic; Congo; Congo, The Democratic Republic of the; Côte d'Ivoire; Equatorial Guinea; Ethiopia; Gabon; Ghana; Guinea; Guinea-Bissau; Kenya; Liberia; Malawi; Mozambique; Nigeria; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; South Africa; South Sudan; Sudan; Swaziland; Tanzania, United Republic of; Togo; Uganda; Zambia; Zimbabwe
Vagrant:
Benin; Botswana
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: Ferguson-Lees and Christie (2001) estimate that total the population could number in the upper thousands, although given its range this is perhaps likely to be an underestimate and they also state that, for this reason, an estimate of tens of thousands might be expected. On this basis, the population is estimated at 5,000-50,000 mature individuals until better information becomes available.
Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: It inhabits forest, woodland, savanna and shrubland, as well as some modified habitats, such as plantations and secondary growth (Ferguson-Lees and Christie 2001), and can persist in small forest fragments (Dowsett-Lemaire and Dowsett 2006). It shows high resilience to heavy deforestation and degradation in some areas (F. Dowsett-Lemaire in litt. 2012), although such changes are assumed to cause local declines in population density.
Systems: Terrestrial; Freshwater

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Although the species is welcomed by foresters in some areas, it is subjected to a number of significant threats throughout much of its range, including deforestation (carried out for timber extraction, charcoal production, the encroachment of agriculture and plantations, shifting cultivation and mining), competition from humans for prey species (with apparently unsustainable levels of exploitation for bushmeat in some areas), direct persecution in an estimated 90% of its range (e.g. for food, arrow-fletching, witchcraft, ornaments and its pest status and threat to humans) and human disturbance (Ferguson-Lees and Christie 2001, Hockey et al. 2005, Thomsett 2011). In Ghana, it is threatened by deforestation and hunting, including of its main prey (F. Dowsett-Lemaire in litt. 2012). Some once-occupied areas in Ghana have now been almost totally deforested, whilst others, such as Bosomoa Forest Reserve, have been converted to teak plantations (F. Dowsett-Lemaire in litt. 2012). The species may have altered its diet to partly accommodate declines in primate abundance in parts of Ghana, but its population is unlikely not to have been affected by such a dramatic decline in its prey base (which has probably worsened further since the mid-1990s) (B. Phalan in litt. 2012). Although the species appears to be doing well at Udzungwa, Tanzania, it may be absent as a breeding species from several areas (e.g. Uzungwa scarp, Kising’a-Rugaro, New Dabaga), owing to prey depletion by humans (T. Jones in litt. 2012). In Nigeria, it seems likely that the population has been impacted by widespread forest clearance in the south of the country (P. Hall in litt. 2012).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Conservation Actions Underway
The species occurs in a number of protected areas across its vast range.

Conservation Actions Proposed
Conduct regular surveys to monitor populations at selected sites throughout its range. Monitor rates of habitat loss and degradation across its range. Carry out research into the impacts of human competition for prey species. Increase the total area of suitable habitat that is protected. Conduct education activities to reduce direct persecution and hunting pressure on prey species.

Citation: BirdLife International 2012. Stephanoaetus coronatus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 28 November 2014.
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