Map_thumbnail_large_font

Ducula rosacea 

Scope: Global
Language: English
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_onStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Translate page into:

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Aves Columbiformes Columbidae

Scientific Name: Ducula rosacea (Temminck, 1835)
Common Name(s):
English Pink-headed Imperial-pigeon, Pink-headed Imperial Pigeon, Pink-headed Imperial-Pigeon
Taxonomic Source(s): del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A. and Fishpool, L.D.C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 1: Non-passerines. Lynx Edicions BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened ver 3.1
Year Published: 2016
Date Assessed: 2016-10-01
Assessor(s): BirdLife International
Reviewer(s): Butchart, S. & Symes, A.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Collar, N., Khwaja, N., Mahood, S., O'Brien, A., Taylor, J., Tobias, J.
Justification:
Although it has quite wide range, this species is uncommon and probably has a moderately small population, hence its classification as Near Threatened. It is much sought after by hunters and suffers from the effects of habitat degradation and is therefore thought to be declining.

Previously published Red List assessments:

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:Ducula rosacea is restricted to Indonesia and Timor-Leste, where it occurs in four Endemic Bird Areas (Northern Nusa Tenggara, Timor and Wetar, Banda Sea Islands, and Northern Maluku) and five Secondary Areas (Seribu Islands, Masalembu, Kangean, Salayar and Bonerate Islands, and Tukangbesi Islands). Despite this wide range, the species appears to have become very rare at least in some areas, and rather uncommon elsewhere. It is thought to be the commonest pigeon on Wetar, with the population on this island estimated to be "very large" (Trainor et al. 2009).

Countries occurrence:
Native:
Indonesia; Timor-Leste
Additional data:
Continuing decline in area of occupancy (AOO):Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in area of occupancy (AOO):NoEstimated extent of occurrence (EOO) - km2:2300000
Continuing decline in extent of occurrence (EOO):UnknownExtreme fluctuations in extent of occurrence (EOO):No
Continuing decline in number of locations:Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in the number of locations:No
Upper elevation limit (metres):1100
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as generally fairly scarce, although common on Tanahjampea, Timor, Tanimbar and Wetar islands (Gibbs et al. 2001, Trainor et al. 2009).

Trend Justification:  There are no data on population trends, but hunting and habitat degradation are suspected to be driving a moderate decline.
Current Population Trend:Decreasing
Additional data:
Number of mature individuals:UnknownContinuing decline of mature individuals:Unknown
Extreme fluctuations:NoPopulation severely fragmented:No
Continuing decline in subpopulations:Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in subpopulations:NoAll individuals in one subpopulation:No
No. of individuals in largest subpopulation:100

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:It inhabits forest, scrub and farmland up to 930 m (Trainor et al. 2009).

Systems:Terrestrial
Continuing decline in area, extent and/or quality of habitat:Unknown
Generation Length (years):6.6
Movement patterns:Not a Migrant

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): It is eagerly sought by hunters and is thought to be affected by habitat loss. Whilst most of the rugged forest on Wetar is thought to be secure, the accessible areas near the coast are vulnerable to pressure from agriculture and logging, with mining and road construction possibly also posing a threat (Trainor et al. 2009).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Conservation Actions Underway
None is known.

Conservation Actions Proposed
Survey to assess its population size. Regularly monitor at certain sites throughout its range to determine population trends. Where possible, control hunting, perhaps using awareness campaigns. Protect significant areas of lowland forest on many islands across its range.


Citation: BirdLife International. 2016. Ducula rosacea. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T22691705A93321860. . Downloaded on 18 November 2017.
Disclaimer: To make use of this information, please check the <Terms of Use>.
Feedback: If you see any errors or have any questions or suggestions on what is shown on this page, please provide us with feedback so that we can correct or extend the information provided