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Phaenicophaeus diardi

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA AVES CUCULIFORMES CUCULIDAE

Scientific Name: Phaenicophaeus diardi
Species Authority: (Lesson, 1830)
Common Name(s):
English Black-bellied Malkoha

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened ver 3.1
Year Published: 2012
Date Assessed: 2012-05-01
Assessor(s): BirdLife International
Reviewer(s): Butchart, S. & Symes, A.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Benstead, P., Bird, J., Taylor, J.
Justification:
This forest-associated species is listed as Near Threatened because it is suspected to be undergoing a moderately rapid decline owing to the extensive loss of lowland forests from large areas of the Sundaic lowlands. It is not considered more threatened because it can use secondary habitats and occurs at higher elevations.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Phaenicophaeus diardi occurs from south Tenasserim, Myanmar, peninsular Thailand, Sabah, Sarawak and Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, and Kalimantan and Sumatra, Indonesia (BirdLife International 2001). Although widespread and common in many parts of its range, it is presumably declining owing to deforestation.

Countries:
Native:
Brunei Darussalam; Indonesia; Malaysia; Myanmar; Thailand
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as common in Thailand and Borneo and uncommon in Malaysia (del Hoyo et al. 1997).
Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: It occurs in primary or secondary evergreen forest, swamp forest, bamboo or mangroves to 1,220 m. It is typically found in dense undergrowth and creepers. It forages for insects and breeds in January-April.

Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Rates of forest loss in the Sundaic lowlands have been extremely rapid (Kalimantan lost nearly 25% of its evergreen forest during 1985-1997, and Sumatra lost almost 30% of its 1985 cover), because of a variety of factors, including the escalation of logging and land conversion, with deliberate targeting of all remaining stands of valuable timber including those inside protected areas, plus forest fires (particularly in 1997-1998).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Conservation Actions Underway
None are known.

Conservation Actions Proposed
Assess the species's dependence on forest habitats. If appropriate calculate rates of decline inferred from rates of forest loss. Effectively protect significant areas of suitable habitat at key sites, in both strictly protected areas and community led multiple use areas.


Citation: BirdLife International 2012. Phaenicophaeus diardi. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 18 December 2014.
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