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Notocitellus adocetus 

Scope: Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_onStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Rodentia Sciuridae

Scientific Name: Notocitellus adocetus
Species Authority: Merriam, 1903
Common Name(s):
English Lesser Tropical Ground Squirel, Tropical Ground Squirrel
Spanish Ardilla terrestre, Ardillón del Balsas
Synonym(s):
Spermophilus adocetus (Merriam, 1903)
Taxonomic Source(s): Helgen, K.M., Cole, F.R.,Helgen, L.E. and Wilson, D.E. 2009. Generic Revision in the Holarctic Ground Squirrel Genus Spermophilus. Journal of Mammalogy 90(2): 270-305.
Taxonomic Notes: Generic synonyms are Callospermophilus, Citellus, Otospermophilus. This species is now recognized under the genus Notocitellus (Helgen et al. 2009).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2016
Date Assessed: 2016-06-10
Assessor(s): de Grammont, P.C. & Cuarón, A.
Reviewer(s): Amori, G.
Justification:
This species is listed as Least Concern in because of its wide distribution, presumed large population, occurrence in a number of protected areas, high tolerance to some degree of habitat modification, and because it is unlikely to be declining at nearly the rate required to qualify for listing in a threatened category.
Previously published Red List assessments:

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species is endemic to Mexico, occurring in the states of Distrito Federal, Guerrero, Jalisco, Michoacan, and Mexico (Thorington and Hoffmann 2005, Helgen et al. 2009). Most of its range is in the Trans-Mexican volcanic belt.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Mexico (Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco, México State, Michoacán)
Additional data:
Upper elevation limit (metres):3000
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:This species is widely distributed (Helgen et al. 2009), and common in suitable areas (Best 1995). Its population size varies from year to year and among seasons (Villa-R. 1943 in Best 1995).
Current Population Trend:Stable
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:This species occurs in humid lowlands, desert shrub areas, tropical deciduous forest and arid areas on the Mexican plateau. It can be found at elevations up to 3,000 m in elevation (Helgen et al. 2009). This species can also be found in areas with xerophytic vegetation, in rocky areas along canyon sides, around stone walls and corrals near ranches, and in agricultural areas (Villa-R 1943, Howell 1938).

It uses burrows that are made in open ground at the base of a tree or bush, in rocky areas along small ravines, or under mesquite. This species is an omnivore, and the dried and black seeds of Crescentia are an important part of its diet, as well as the fruits of plum trees. This species may cause significant damage to cultivated crops, such as corn, beans, and sorghum. It is possible that this species has spread its range into the more arid habitats of the Mexican Plateau because of the large areas under cultivation (Best 1995).
Systems:Terrestrial
Generation Length (years):3

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Deforestation threatens a majority of species in this area (Botello 2015).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: There are no specific conservation measures in place for this species. It is found in Pico Tancitaro National Park and Reserva de la Biosfera Zicuirán-Infiernillo.

Citation: de Grammont, P.C. & Cuarón, A. 2016. Notocitellus adocetus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T20477A22265744. . Downloaded on 26 September 2016.
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