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Etheostoma lawrencei

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA ACTINOPTERYGII PERCIFORMES PERCIDAE

Scientific Name: Etheostoma lawrencei
Species Authority: Ceas & Burr, 2002
Common Name(s):
English Headwater Darter

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2013
Date Assessed: 2012-12-20
Assessor(s): NatureServe
Reviewer(s): Smith, K. & Darwall, W.R.T.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Hammerson, G.A. & Ormes, M.
Justification:
This species is listed as Least Concern in view of the fairly large extent of occurrence, large number of subpopulations, large population size, apparently stable trend, and lack of major threats.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species' range includes the upper Green River system down to Mud River, Kentucky; middle Cumberland River system, from Cumberland Falls, Kentucky, to Dillard Creek, Tennessee (including lower tributaries of Caney Fork); and upper Salt River system, Kentucky (Ceas and Burr 2002, Page and Burr 2011).

Headwaters of the Salt River system; upper Green River system, including the Nolin River; and the Cumberland River system from Wilburn Creek on the north and Dillard Creek on the south side of the Cumberland River, Smith County, Tennessee, upstream to near Cumberland Falls (Ceas 1997). Isolated populations have been found in Round Lick Creek, Wilson-Smith counties, Tennessee, and Rock Springs Branch and Mine Lick Creek, two tributaries of the lower Caney Fork River, Putnam County, Tennessee (Ceas 1997).

Extent of occurrence is roughly 10,000 square kilometers.
Countries:
Native:
United States
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: This species is represented by a fairly large number of occurrences (subpopulations). Ceas and Burr (2002) mapped several dozen collection sites representing probably at least a few dozen distinct occurrences.

Total adult population size is unknown but presumably exceeds 10,000. This darter is common to abundant in suitable habitat; it is not unusual to capture 100 breeding individuals in a 15-metre length of stream during a 15-minute sampling period (Ceas and Burr 2002).

Trend over the past 10 years or three generations is uncertain but likely to be relatively stable. Available qualitative assessments indicate that distribution and abundance are currently stable (Warren et al. 2000, Ceas and Burr 2002).
Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This darter is most abundant in small to medium (1–5 m wide) upland gravel and cobble streams, in moderately flowing to swift shallow riffles and runs; also in pools, especially if in or near a spring or when riffles and runs become temporarily dewatered during low flow; sometimes in flowing water in interstitial spaces in substrate (Ceas and Burr 2002). Most inhabited streams are spring-fed first and second order streams and small second and third order streams (Ceas and Burr 2002). Spawning has been observed in unoccupied Creek Chub nests; breeding males most often occur in lower parts of riffles and adjacent upper runs; between spawning bouts, females may occur under cover along stream edges (Ceas and Burr 2002).
Systems: Freshwater

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This species is not utilized.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): No significant threats have been identified.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Currently, this species is of relatively low conservation concern and does not require significant additional protection or major management, monitoring, or research action.

Citation: NatureServe 2013. Etheostoma lawrencei. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 23 October 2014.
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