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Coris aygula

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA ACTINOPTERYGII PERCIFORMES LABRIDAE

Scientific Name: Coris aygula
Species Authority: Lacepède, 1801
Common Name(s):
English Clown coris, Clown wrasse, False clownwrasse, Humphead wrasse, Twinspot wrasse
French Clarisse clown, Coris à points bleus, Girelle à tache orange, Girelle bossue
Spanish Doncella circense
Synonym(s):
Coris angulata Lacepède, 1801
Coris angulata Lacepède, 1801
Coris angulatus Lacepède, 1801
Coris angulatus Lacepède, 1801
Coris cyanea Macleay, 1883
Coris cyanea Macleay, 1883
Coris imbris Tanaka, 1918
Coris imbris Tanaka, 1918
Coris variegata Ramsay & Ogilby, 1887
Coris variegata Ramsay & Ogilby, 1887
Hemicoris cingulum (Lacepède, 1801)
Hemicoris cingulum (Lacepède, 1801)
Julis cingulum Valenciennes, 1839
Julis cingulum Valenciennes, 1839
Julis coris Valenciennes, 1839
Julis coris Valenciennes, 1839
Julis gibbifrons Quoy & Gaimard, 1834
Julis gibbifrons Quoy & Gaimard, 1834
Julis ruppelii Bennett, 1831
Julis ruppelii Bennett, 1831
Julis semipunctatus Rüppell, 1835
Julis semipunctatus Rüppell, 1835
Labrus aureomaculatus Bennett, 1830
Labrus aureomaculatus Bennett, 1830
Labrus cingulum Lacepède, 1801
Labrus cingulum Lacepède, 1801

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2008-04-12
Assessor(s): Choat, J.H. & Pollard, D.
Reviewer(s): Sadovy, Y. & Carpenter, K.E.
Justification:
This species is a large widespread wrasse with a highly distinctive juvenile phase. As with all large wrasses, this species is relatively rare and never abundant in any part of its geographical range. Threats include collection of juvenilles for the aquarium trade and also fisheries, however, it is a very widely distributed species. It is listed as Least Concern. This species requires monitoring to assess its status under conditions of increased fishing in most coral reef environments.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is found from the Red Sea and East Africa in the west (Randall 1986) to the Line and Ducie Islands in the east, northward to southern Japan, southward to Lord Howe Island, Rapa Islands and also in Pohnpei (G. Allen unpublished survey).

Indo-Pacific distribution achieves its highest abundance on the Australian plate, especially in Western Australia (J.H. Choat pers. comm. 2008).
Countries:
Native:
American Samoa (American Samoa); Australia; British Indian Ocean Territory; China; Christmas Island; Cocos (Keeling) Islands; Comoros; Cook Islands; Djibouti; Egypt; Eritrea; Fiji; French Polynesia; Guam; India; Indonesia; Israel; Japan; Jordan; Kenya; Kiribati; Madagascar; Malaysia; Maldives; Marshall Islands; Mauritius; Mayotte; Micronesia, Federated States of ; Mozambique; Myanmar; Nauru; New Caledonia; Niue; Northern Mariana Islands; Oman; Palau; Papua New Guinea; Philippines; Pitcairn; Réunion; Samoa; Saudi Arabia; Seychelles; Solomon Islands; Somalia; South Africa; Sri Lanka; Sudan; Taiwan, Province of China; Tanzania, United Republic of; Thailand; Tokelau; Tonga; Tuvalu; United States; United States Minor Outlying Islands; Vanuatu; Wallis and Futuna; Yemen
FAO Marine Fishing Areas:
Native:
Atlantic – southeast; Indian Ocean – eastern; Indian Ocean – western; Pacific – eastern central; Pacific – northwest; Pacific – southwest; Pacific – western central
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: This is a common species although not always abundant. Abundance estimates (mean number per hectare) in Seychelles 0.3-0.5, Cocos Keeling 0.1-0.9, West Australia off shore 0.4-1.8 , GBR 0.4-0.9, and Coral Sea 0.33 with highest numbers on WA Offshore reefs (Rowley Shoals) (JH Choat pers. comm. 2008).

This is one of the large tropical wrasses with a broad geographic distribution. As with most of the other widely distributed tropical species, it is relatively rare in any particular locality (0.1-1.8 individuals per hectare) over much of its range and we do not have a very good handle on numbers or trends. For the large wrasses, wide-spread tropical species such as C.undulatus, C.aygula, L.maximus and possibly C.schoenleinii have been impacted by fisheries over much of their ranges.
Population Trend: Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species occurs in the vicinity of sand or rubble patches of exposed outer reef flats, lagoon reefs, and seaward reefs (Myers 1991), often in semi-exposed surge zones (Kuiter and Tonozuka 2001). Adults are solitary. Juveniles are common in shallow tide pools (Sommer et al. 1996). It feeds mainly on hard-shelled invertebrates including crustaceans, molluscs and sea urchins (Westneat 2001). Minimum depth reported of three m from Baensch and Debelius (1997). Randall (1999) questioned the identity of specimens exceeding 70 cm. Size recorded to 120 cm but this record is questionable. Largest size recorded from GBR was at 47.8 cm (FL).

It is a reef front species generally occurring on outer slopes of reefs to at least 45m (1-26m in Western Australia). Juveniles are found in shallow water of sheltered habitats. Maximum recorded age 16 yrs (J.H. Choat pers. comm.). It is a rare fast growing wrasses achieving large size by rapid growth of males (J.H. Choat pers. comm.) This species is probably protogynous but this needs confirmation.
Systems: Marine

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: Juveniles of this species are sought in the aquarium trade. In Australia juveniles are moderately priced at $15-20 per individual. It is possibly taken opportunistically in fisheries throughout the Indo-Pacific. This species is not a feature in catalogues of the Hong Kong live reef fish trade (Lau and Li 2000).

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Threats to this species include harvesting of juveniles for the aquarium trade (Wood 2001), artisanal and subsistence fishing in the Indo-Pacific.

For the large wrasses, wide spread tropical species, such as C. undulatus, C. aygula, L. maximus and possibly C. schoenleinii, have been impacted by fishing over much of their ranges. Threats must be considered in the context of local rarity but widespread distribution (J.H. Choat pers. comm. 2008).

This species consistently shows up in subsistence and recreational fisheries in Guam (every year since 1985 -2007), caught mainly by hook and line and spear (R. Myers pers. comm. 2008, Guam Division of Aquatic and Wildlife Resources data, unpublished annual reports).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: There are no specific conservation measures in place for this species. Its distribution overlaps several marine protected areas within its range.

Citation: Choat, J.H. & Pollard, D. 2010. Coris aygula. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 20 October 2014.
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