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Procambarus attiguus

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA ARTHROPODA MALACOSTRACA DECAPODA CAMBARIDAE

Scientific Name: Procambarus attiguus
Species Authority: Hobbs & Franz, 1992
Common Name(s):
English Silver Glen Springs Cave Crayfish
Taxonomic Notes: This species is one of several troglobitic species in the subgenus Ortmannicus. It is highly distinctive, and its closest affinities are with Procambarus delicatus, which appears to be on a line leading to Troglocambarus (J. Cordeiro, T. Jones and R. Thoma pers. comm. 2009).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Critically Endangered B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2010-06-01
Assessor(s): Cordeiro, J., Jones, T. & Thoma, R.F.
Reviewer(s): Collen, B. & Richman, N.
Contributor(s): Livingston, F., Livingston, F., Soulsby, A.-M., Batchelor, A., Dyer, E., Whitton, F., Milligan, H.T., Smith, J., Lutz, M.L., De Silva, R., McGuinness, S., Kasthala, G., Jopling, B., Sullivan, K. & Cryer, G.
Justification:
Procambarus attiguus has been assessed as Critically Endangered under criterion B1ab(iii)+B2ab(iii). This species has an area of occupancy of less than 10 km² and occurs in one cave chamber locality. It is threatened by water pollution and has experienced disturbance from tourists (snorkelers and scuba divers) although the latter has now been outlawed. More decisive protection measures should be implemented, such as the construction of cave gates, to protect this species and other cave fauna. Currently, the life history of this species is unknown, but due to the low levels of nutrients reaching the cave chamber due to the strong outflow current, it can be assumed that this species has a late reproductive maturity and a long life history making it susceptible to loss of individuals.
History:
1996 Critically Endangered

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is known from the type locality at Silver Glen Springs, Astor Park, Marion County, Florida (Hobbs and Franz 1992). This species has a distribution of less than 10 km2.
Countries:
Native:
United States (Florida)
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: Although only three animals have been collected, Hobbs and Franz (1992) reported that the collectors observed several more sequestered in small crevices in the walls of the cave. A recent scientific dive, however, observed numbers comparable to those present when the species was first described (P Moler pers. comm. 2010)
Population Trend: Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species is found in subterranean waters in a cave chamber 213 m from its main entrance, consisting of a water depth of 49 m (Hobbs and Franz 1992). Individuals were observed sequestering in crevices or on the substrate. This cave system has a strong outflow current, and as a result there is no accumulation of organic detritus in the cave. Furthermore, the food source for this species may come from bacterial growth and the death of other cave species (Hobbs and Franz 1992). The life history of this species is unknown, but due to the low levels of nutrients reaching the cave chamber due to the strong outflow current, it can be assumed that this species has a late reproductive maturity and a long life history making it susceptible to loss of individuals.
Systems: Freshwater

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The cave where this species is present, is located in a recreation area in the Ocala Natural Forest (Florida Adventuring 2008). The pool outside of the cave was used frequently by tourists for snorkelling and scuba diving (Florida Adventuring 2008), although this has now been prohibited (P. Moler pers. comm. 2010). The entrance to Natural Well solution tube has been roped off to protect wildlife (Florida Adventuring 2008). Water pollution from tourists may also have a negative impact on this species (J. Cordeiro, T. Jones and R. Thoma pers. comm. 2009).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species has been given a Global Heritage Status Rank of G1 by NatureServe and assessed as 'endangered' by the American Fisheries Society (Taylor et al. 2007, NatureServe 2009). It is only known from a locality that may be a managed area, as the site was purchased by St. Johns River Water Management District and is being developed as a public recreation area, probably to be managed by the U.S. Forest Service (Franz pers. comm. 1992 cited in NatureServe 2009). Further research is required to determine the population abundance this species. Protection measures are also needed for this species.

Citation: Cordeiro, J., Jones, T. & Thoma, R.F. 2010. Procambarus attiguus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 21 December 2014.
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