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Furcifer angeli

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA REPTILIA SQUAMATA CHAMAELEONIDAE

Scientific Name: Furcifer angeli
Species Authority: (Brygoo & Domergue, 1968)
Common Name(s):
English Angel's Chameleon
Synonym(s):
Chamaeleo angeli Brygoo & Domergue, 1968

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2011
Date Assessed: 2011-01-26
Assessor(s): Jenkins, R.K.B., Andreone, F., Andriamazava, A., Anjeriniaina, M., Brady, L., Glaw, F., Griffiths, R.A., Rabibisoa, N., Rakotomalala, D., Randrianantoandro, J.C., Randrianiriana, J., Randrianizahana , H., Ratsoavina, F. & Robsomanitrandrasana, E.
Reviewer(s): Bowles, P. & Tolley, K.
Justification:
Listed as Least Concern on the basis that this species has an extent of occurrence of at least 31,506 km², and appears adaptable to some degradation of habitat.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:

This species is endemic to Madagascar where it is restricted to areas of dry forest in the northwest of the island (Glaw and Vences 2007). It is known from four localities between Anjiamangirana in the north and Parc National de Namoroka to the south (Raselimanana 2008). It has also been recorded from Bongolava (Randrianantoandro et al. 2010). There is a record from the coast (Antsanitia) and from Ambohibola further inland (C. Raxworthy pers. comm. January 2011). The lizard has been recorded at elevations from 40 to 300 m, and has an estimated extent of occurrence of 31,506 km².

Countries:
Native:
Madagascar
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: This species is reported to be less common at the Ankarokaroka site within Parc National d'Ankarafantsika than in sites within the dry forest of Parc National Baie de Baly, near Soalala (Ramanamanjato and Rabibisoa 2002). As the species is found in nonforested areas, and can survive close to villages, the population is presently thought to be stable.
Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:

The species occurs in lowland dry deciduous forest. In Parc National d'Ankarafantsika Angel's chameleon was found in degraded deciduous forest (Ramanamanjato and Rabibisoa 2002), along road roadsides and close to villages. Raselimanana (2008) reports that this diurnal lizard lives in trees and has a close association with dry forest. This species is sexually dimorphic, with males being both longer and heavier than females (Carpenter 2003). This species is often found in the same areas of forest as Oustalet's Chameleon (F. oustaleti) (Carpenter 2003).

Systems: Terrestrial

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This species is listed on CITES Appendix II but has been subject to a trade suspension since 1994. Prior to the trade suspension it was not traded at very high levels, with only a single individual recorded on the WCMC trade database for 1988-1998.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s):

The conversion and destruction of deciduous forest within its range poses the main threat to this chameleon. These forests are under pressure from expanding human population. Illegal logging, wildfire, and slash and burn agriculture all contribute to a reduction in the quantity of the remaining deciduous forest.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species is known from Parc National d'Ankarafantsika (Ramanamanjato and Rabibisoa 2002), Parc National Baie de Baly (Carpenter 2003), Parc National de Namoroka (Raselimanana 2008) and Bongolava New Protected Area (Randrianantoandro et al. 2010). It is listed as a protected species under Category I, Class II, of Malagasy law which permits authorized collection from the wild outside of strict protected areas (but imports from Madagascar are currently suspended by CITES). Like many Furcifer species it uses dry areas of open forest vegetation, and research is needed to determine whether it is a forest specialist or whether it can survive in more heavily degraded areas of vegetation, as well as to identify population trends.

Citation: Jenkins, R.K.B., Andreone, F., Andriamazava, A., Anjeriniaina, M., Brady, L., Glaw, F., Griffiths, R.A., Rabibisoa, N., Rakotomalala, D., Randrianantoandro, J.C., Randrianiriana, J., Randrianizahana , H., Ratsoavina, F. & Robsomanitrandrasana, E. 2011. Furcifer angeli. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 23 October 2014.
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