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Isophya lemnotica 

Scope: Global
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Arthropoda Insecta Orthoptera Tettigoniidae

Scientific Name: Isophya lemnotica Werner, 1932
Common Name(s):
English Limnos Plump Bush-cricket, Limnos Bush-cricket
Taxonomic Source(s): Eades, D.C., Otte, D., Cigliano, M.M. and Braun, H. 2016. Orthoptera Species File. Version 5.0/5.0. Available at: http://Orthoptera.SpeciesFile.org.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2016
Date Assessed: 2015-02-17
Assessor(s): Willemse, L.P.M., Hochkirch, A., Heller, K.-G., Kati, V., Papapavlou, K. & Tzirkalli, E.
Reviewer(s): Bushell, M., Cálix, M. & Nieto, A.
Contributor(s): Danielczak, A.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): García, M.
Justification:
The Limnos Plump Bush-cricket (Isophya lemnotica) is endemic to Greece, where it is only known from the island of Limnos in the northern part of the Aegean Sea. This species is assessed as Least Concern since although it has a restricted geographic range (maximum extent of occurrence (EOO) is 790 km², maximum area of occupancy (AOO) is 475 km²), it is widespread across the island, and is not confined to very particular, local, rare or threatened habitats. In addition, it is found both in areas not used or or hardly used by humans (hills covered predominantly with low spiny bushes), and in agricultural areas; and the population is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a threatened category. Possible threats the species may face should be better documented. Further research into the population size and trend, its ecology and the threats to it is required.
Previously published Red List assessments:

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:The Limnos Plump Bush-cricket is endemic to Greece, where it is only known from the island of Limnos in the northern part of the Aegean Sea (Willemse 1984). This species was first discovered in 1927 and it was only recorded for the second time in 2015. This species is widespread across the island, its maximum extent of occurrence (EOO) is 790 km², and its maximum area of occupancy (AOO) is 475 km².
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Greece (East Aegean Is.)
Additional data:
Estimated area of occupancy (AOO) - km2:475
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:Until 2015 this species was only known from a single male and female used for its description (deposited in the Vienna museum). A survey carried out in 2015 which included the use of a bat-detector to assess its presence, showed that it is widespread across the island. Although a visual confirmation could not be made at each spot where its presence was confirmed by audio signals, individuals have visually been spotted across the entire island. Overall densities of subpopulations are low; at one site eight specimens were counted in a 10x10 m2. As the species has only been recorded on two occasions with an interval of more than 80 years, the population trend is not known.
Current Population Trend:Unknown
Additional data:

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:

Isophya species are, as a rule, early season species with the adults appearing in May. On the island of Limnos adults of this species have also been found in May, predominantly at sites where at least part of the vegetation consisted of a lush herbal component. At some sites visited during the 2015 survey (Sanctuary of Kaviri, near Agia Sophia and on Fakos Peninsula), this species was found in a habitat with hardly any herbal component, where the vegetation consisted of Sarcopoterium spp., Cistus spp. and small yellow flowering Broomlike bushes (possibly Genista spp.).

Systems:Terrestrial

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This species is not utilized.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s):

Possible threats to this species may include the expansion or intensification of agriculture and livestock grazing, climate change and wildfires. It remains difficult to make any firm statements about the significance of any of these threats. The fact that the species is restricted to Limnos makes it very vulnerable to threats. A change in human activities (intensification of agriculture), or large bushfires could have serious effects on subpopulations on the island.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions:

The presence of this species has been re-confirmed in 2015, after its discovery in 1927. A three-day survey carried out in 2015 showed that the species is widespread across the island. Detailed information about densities of subpopulation and the overall population size are lacking. Possible threats the species may face should be better documented. Further research is needed into the population sized and trend, and into its ecology.


Citation: Willemse, L.P.M., Hochkirch, A., Heller, K.-G., Kati, V., Papapavlou, K. & Tzirkalli, E. 2016. Isophya lemnotica. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T17181617A70572787. . Downloaded on 16 January 2018.
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