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Coryphaena equiselis

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA ACTINOPTERYGII PERCIFORMES CORYPHAENIDAE

Scientific Name: Coryphaena equiselis
Species Authority: Linnaeus, 1758
Common Name(s):
English Pompano Dolphinfish, Mahi Mahi
French Coryphène Dauphin, Caméléon
Spanish Dorado, Dorado Chato, Dorado Enano
Synonym(s):
Coryphaena aurata Lacepède, 1801
Coryphaena aurata Rafinesque, 1810
Coryphaena azorica Valenciennes, 1833
Coryphaena equisetis Osbeck, 1765
Coryphaena lessonii Valenciennes, 1833
Coryphaena socialis Bennett, 1840
Lampugus neapolitanus Valenciennes, 1833
Lampugus punctulatus Valenciennes, 1833
Taxonomic Notes: This species is frequently misidentified as juvenile or female of Coryphaena hippurus.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2011
Date Assessed: 2010-09-16
Assessor(s): Collette, B., Acero, A., Amorim, A.F., Boustany, A., Canales Ramirez, C., Cardenas, G., Carpenter, K.E., de Oliveira Leite Jr., N., Di Natale, A., Fox, W., Fredou, F.L., Graves, J., Viera Hazin, F.H., Juan Jorda, M., Minte Vera, C., Miyabe, N., Montano Cruz, R., Nelson, R., Oxenford, H., Schaefer, K., Serra, R., Sun, C., Teixeira Lessa, R.P., Pires Ferreira Travassos, P.E., Uozumi, Y. & Yanez, E.
Reviewer(s): Russell, B. & Polidoro, B.
Justification:
This species is widespread, and is very prolific. Given its small size, it is of less commercial importance than Coryphaena hippurus, although no catch statistics are available for this species. There are no major threats. It is listed as Least Concern.
For further information about this species, see TUNAS_SkiJumpEffect.pdf.
A PDF viewer such as Adobe Reader is required.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is found worldwide in tropical and subtropical seas.

There are four records of Coryphaena equiselis from the Mediterranean: one record from the Algerian coast (Djabali et al. 1993), one from the Ligurian Sea north of Corsica, one from the Tyrrhenian Sea north of Sicily, and one from the southern Aegean Sea, east of Peloponisos. There are large catches of Coryphaena spp in the Mediterranean, but the vast majority is C. hippurus. C. equiselis is likely a vagrant in the Mediterranean Sea.

It has been found to depths of 119 m (Nobrega et al. 2009).
Countries:
Native:
Algeria; American Samoa (American Samoa); Angola (Angola); Antigua and Barbuda; Aruba; Australia; Bahamas; Bangladesh; Barbados; Belize; Benin; Bermuda; Brazil; Brunei Darussalam; Cambodia; Cape Verde; Cayman Islands; Chile (Easter Is.); China; Christmas Island; Cocos (Keeling) Islands; Colombia; Congo; Congo, The Democratic Republic of the; Cook Islands; Costa Rica; Côte d'Ivoire; Cuba; Djibouti; Dominica; Dominican Republic; Ecuador (Ecuador (mainland), Galápagos); Egypt; El Salvador; Eritrea; Fiji; France; French Guiana; French Polynesia; Gabon; Gambia; Ghana; Guadeloupe; Guam; Guatemala; Guinea; Guinea-Bissau; Guyana; Haiti; Honduras; Hong Kong; India (Andaman Is.); Indonesia; Iran, Islamic Republic of; Israel; Italy; Jamaica; Japan; Jordan; Kenya; Kiribati; Korea, Democratic People's Republic of; Korea, Republic of; Liberia; Macao; Madagascar; Malaysia; Maldives; Malta; Marshall Islands; Mauritania; Mauritius; Mayotte; Mexico; Micronesia, Federated States of ; Morocco; Mozambique; Myanmar; Namibia; Nauru; Netherlands; New Caledonia; New Zealand; Nicaragua; Nigeria; Niue; Norfolk Island; Northern Mariana Islands; Oman; Pakistan; Palau; Panama; Papua New Guinea; Peru; Philippines; Pitcairn; Portugal (Azores); Puerto Rico; Réunion; Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha; Saint Kitts and Nevis; Saint Lucia; Saint Vincent and the Grenadines; Samoa; Sao Tomé and Principe; Saudi Arabia; Senegal; Seychelles; Sierra Leone; Singapore; Solomon Islands; Somalia; South Africa; Spain (Canary Is.); Sri Lanka; Sudan; Suriname; Taiwan, Province of China; Tanzania, United Republic of; Thailand; Tokelau; Trinidad and Tobago; Tuvalu; United States (Hawaiian Is.); United States Minor Outlying Islands (Howland-Baker Is., Johnston I., US Line Is.); Vanuatu; Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of; Viet Nam; Virgin Islands, British; Virgin Islands, U.S.; Wallis and Futuna; Yemen
FAO Marine Fishing Areas:
Native:
Atlantic – northeast; Atlantic – eastern central; Atlantic – southwest; Atlantic – southeast; Atlantic – northwest; Atlantic – western central; Indian Ocean – eastern; Indian Ocean – western; Mediterranean and Black Sea; Pacific – western central; Pacific – eastern central; Pacific – northwest; Pacific – southwest; Pacific – southeast
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: This species is smaller and less important to commercial fisheries than C. hippurus. There are no catch statistics for this species. In the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) catch statistics this species is grouped with C. hippurus. The juveniles of C. equiselis are more common than C. hippurus (Gibbs and Collette 1959).
Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This pelagic, oceanodromous species is primarily oceanic but may enter coastal waters. It usually forms schools. It follows boats and may be found under floating objects. It feeds on small fishes and squid.

This species is fast-growing and short-lived. Maximum size is 75 cm, but more commonly is found to 50 cm. The all-tackle gamefish record is of a 3.86 kg fish taken in Baltimore Canyon, Maryland in 2008 (IGFA 2011). This species is much smaller and less important to fisheries than C. hippurus. Age at first maturity is 3–4 months. Spawning is probably year-round at water temperatures greater than 21°C (Gibbs and Collette 1959, Ditty 2005, Collette 2010).
Systems: Marine

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This is a minor commercial species that is marketed fresh and considered an excellent food fish.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Although there is no directed commercially fishery, it is taken incidentally. There are no major threats to this species. It is widespread and very prolific.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This highly migratory species is listed in Annex I of the 1982 Convention on the Law of the Sea. Anywhere that there are minimum catch size or limits for C. hippurus, this species would also receive protection as it is smaller.

Citation: Collette, B., Acero, A., Amorim, A.F., Boustany, A., Canales Ramirez, C., Cardenas, G., Carpenter, K.E., de Oliveira Leite Jr., N., Di Natale, A., Fox, W., Fredou, F.L., Graves, J., Viera Hazin, F.H., Juan Jorda, M., Minte Vera, C., Miyabe, N., Montano Cruz, R., Nelson, R., Oxenford, H., Schaefer, K., Serra, R., Sun, C., Teixeira Lessa, R.P., Pires Ferreira Travassos, P.E., Uozumi, Y. & Yanez, E. 2011. Coryphaena equiselis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 28 November 2014.
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