Map_thumbnail_large_font

Labeo potail

Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_onStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA ACTINOPTERYGII CYPRINIFORMES CYPRINIDAE

Scientific Name: Labeo potail
Species Authority: (Sykes, 1839)
Common Name(s):
English Deccan Labeo
Synonym(s):
Cyprinus potail Sykes, 1839
Taxonomic Notes: Labeo potail was originally described as Cyprinus potail Sykes (1839) from Temburni on Bhima river, Maharashtra.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Endangered A2acde+3cde+4acde ver 3.1
Year Published: 2013
Date Assessed: 2011-03-27
Assessor(s): Dahanukar, N.
Reviewer(s): Raghavan, R., Ali, A. & Molur, S.
Contributor(s): Molur, S., Bogutskaya, N. & Rema Devi, K.R.
Justification:
Labeo potail has been assessed as Endangered with a conservative estimate of global population decline of 50-60% in the last ten years. Habitat alterations caused by anthropogenic activities including organic and inorganic pollution, harvesting of the fish and competition created by introduced Gangetic carps could be the possible threats contributing to the population decline of this species.
History:
2009 Critically Endangered
2007 Critically Endangered (IUCN 2009.2)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Labeo potail is endemic to the Western Ghats of India (Dahanukar et al. 2004). This species occurs in tributaries of Krishna River system namely Bhima River and its tributaries (Sykes 1841, Fraser 1942, Sarwade and Khillare 2010, Neelesh Dahanukar pers. obs.), Krishna River (Jayaram and Dhas 2000) and Tungabhadra River (David 1956, Shahnawaz and Venkateshwarlu 2009, Shahnawaz et al. 2010). The species has also been recorded from Kaveri Rver system (Shaji and Easa 1995, Rajeev Raghavan and Anvar Ali pers. obs.). David (1963) suggests that the species also occurs in Godavari, however, there are no reliable records. Menon (1999) suggests that the species occurs only in Krishna river system and excludes Kavery River system. Thus, it is essential to evaluate the taxonomic status of the fish from Kavery River system. Report of the species from Hyderabad (Chandrashekar 2004) needs more support and the paper also does not mention the exactly locality from where the species was collected.

The inferred extent of occurrence (EOO) of the species is large as it is distributed throughout the Western Ghats. However, the EOO is suspected to be declining as it is known that the populations of the species described from Mula-Mutha River by (Fraser 1942) are likely to be locally extinct (Kharat et al. 2000).
Countries:
Native:
India (Karnataka, Kerala, Maharashtra)
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: Labeo potail is rare throughout its range (Shahnawaz and Venkateshwarlu 2009, Sarwade and Khillare 2010, Neelesh Dahanukar pers. obs.). The species was recorded in good numbers from Mula-Mutha rivers Pune, Maharashtra by Fraser (1942), however, subsequent studies by Tonapi and Mulherkar (1963), Kharat et al. (2000, 2003) and Wagh and Ghate (2003) were could not record it. In fact it is suspected that the species is locally extinct from Pune (Kharat et al. 2000). In Kerala, a population reduction of 99% has been observed over the past two decades (Kurup et al. 2003). There is no quantitative estimate of population decline of this species from Karnataka and Maharashtra, even though the species is likely to be facing a drastic decline in these areas too (based on the discussions with the fishermen from where the species is recently recorded, Neelesh Dahanukar pers. comm.). Based on the decline of the species in Kerala population, which might be just 20% of the total population of of this species, the conservative estimate of global decline of the species could be assumed to be between 50 to 60%.

The decline could be because of habitat alterations caused by anthropogenic activities including pollution, harvesting of the fish and competition created by introduced carps (Kharat et al. 2000, 2003, Wagh and Ghate 2003, Kurup et al. 2003, Menon 2004).
Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: Labeo potail is a benthopelagic species, which inhabits rivers and streams in the upper reaches (Menon 1999). Habitat quality where the species is found is declining due to alterations caused by anthropogenic activities including organic and inorganic pollution (Kharat et al. 2000, 2003, Wagh and Ghate 2003, N. Dahanukar pers. obs.).
Systems: Freshwater

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: Labeo potail is caught and sold in the local markets. Harvesting of the fish could be a threat to the species (Kharat et al. 2000, 2003).

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Habitat alterations caused by anthropogenic activities including organic and inorganic pollution, harvesting of the fish and competition created by introduced Gangetic carps could be the possible threats contributing to the population decline of this species (Kharat et al. 2000, 2003, Wagh and Ghate 2003, Kurup et al. 2003, Menon 2004).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Currently there is no specific conservation action in placve directed towards this species. It has been recommended that deep pools in the course of the Krishna and Tungabhadra, where the fish settles down in summer during the period of low discharge of water, should be identified and some declared as sanctuaries for the protection of the species (Menon 2004). Research is needed on the population trends and harvest trends of this species.

Citation: Dahanukar, N. 2013. Labeo potail. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 22 December 2014.
Disclaimer: To make use of this information, please check the <Terms of Use>.
Feedback: If you see any errors or have any questions or suggestions on what is shown on this page, please provide us with feedback so that we can correct or extend the information provided