Map_thumbnail_large_font

Semaprochilodus taeniurus 

Scope: Global
Language: English
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_onStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Translate page into:

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Actinopterygii Characiformes Prochilodontidae

Scientific Name: Semaprochilodus taeniurus (Valenciennes, 1821)
Common Name(s):
English Silver Prochilodus
Synonym(s):
Curimatus taeniurus Valenciennes, 1821
Prochilodus taeniurus (Valenciennes, 1821)
Semiprochilodus taeniurus (Valenciennes, 1817)

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2009
Date Assessed: 2007-03-01
Annotations:
Needs updating
Assessor(s): Reis, R & Lima, F.
Reviewer(s): Collen, B., Darwall, W., Ram, M. & Smith, K. (SRLI Freshwater Fish Evaluation Workshop)
Justification:
Assessed as Least Concern due to its wide distribution and ability to occupy a range of habitats. In addition, it is reported to be a common and abundant species, and though it is harvested, there is no evidence of fisheries having a negative impact on population numbers.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This Brazilian species occurs in the Amazon, lower Negro and Madeira rivers (Castro and Vari 2004).
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Brazil
Additional data:
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:This is one of the most common fish in the Amazon basin (Henderson 2006), and the most abundant Semaprochilodus species (Ribeiro and Petrere 1990).
Current Population Trend:Stable
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:S. taeniurus is a potamodromous (migrating within freshwater only) species that inhabits streams, main river channels and floodplain lakes. It is a benthopelagic (ecological region at the lowest level of water body) species that feeds on detritus on the bottom of the river. The jaraqui (members of the genus Semaprochilodus) have a complex migratory pattern, which has probably contributed to its widespread dispersal to both fluvial and lacustrine (prefers lakes or ponds) habitats in all the major water types of central Amazonia. They undertake annual spawning, feeding and dispersal migrations timed to the hydrological cycle (Ribeiro and Petrere 1990).
Systems:Freshwater
Movement patterns:Full Migrant
Congregatory:Congregatory (and dispersive)

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: S. taeniurus and S. insignis together account for nearly 85 per cent of the catches in central Amazonia. There is much evidence to demonstrate that catch levels in central Amazonia are being sustained despite increasing fishing effort, especially with regard to the genus Semaprochilodus (Ribeiro and Petrere, 1990).

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): S. taeniurus and S. insignis together account for nearly 85 per cent of the catches in central Amazonia. There is much evidence to demonstrate that catch levels in central Amazonia are being sustained despite increasing fishing effort, especially with regard to the genus Semaprochilodus (Ribeiro and Petrere, 1990).  Further research is required to confirm if the harvesting is sustainable, and if other threats are causing concern to the populations.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: There are no conservation measures in place although they are needed; a local survey into the harvesting rates could yield interesting results into population trends.

Citation: Reis, R & Lima, F. 2009. Semaprochilodus taeniurus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2009: e.T167746A6376161. . Downloaded on 15 October 2018.
Disclaimer: To make use of this information, please check the <Terms of Use>.
Feedback: If you see any errors or have any questions or suggestions on what is shown on this page, please provide us with feedback so that we can correct or extend the information provided