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Centrophorus seychellorum

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA CHONDRICHTHYES SQUALIFORMES CENTROPHORIDAE

Scientific Name: Centrophorus seychellorum
Species Authority: Baranes, 2003
Common Name(s):
English Seychelles Gulper Shark

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Data Deficient ver 3.1
Year Published: 2009
Date Assessed: 2008-12-01
Assessor(s): McCormack, C.
Reviewer(s): Baranes, A., Valenti, S.V., Gibson, C. & Fowler, S.L. (Shark Red List Authority)
Justification:
The Seychelles Gulper Shark (Centrophorus seychellorum) is a recently described deep water shark known only from the holotype (female; 65.2 cm TL) and paratype (male; 79.7 cm TL) collected during a research cruise by trammel net at 1,000 m off Alphonse Island, Republic of Seychelles in the western Indian Ocean. The full depth distribution of the species is unknown but it is possible that the Seychelles Gulper Shark has already been caught by Seychellois fishermen. Given the species’ apparently narrow range, the limited life history characteristics and vulnerability of Centrophorus species to rapid population depletion in fisheries, any bycatch may be of concern. However, insufficient information is available to assess this species beyond Data Deficient at this time. Further information is required on the species' biology, distribution and importance to fisheries and reassessment should be undertaken as soon as this becomes available.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Western Indian Ocean: known only from the holotype and paratype collected off Alphonse Island, Republic of Seychelles (Baranes 2003).
Countries:
Native:
Seychelles (Seychelles (main island group))
FAO Marine Fishing Areas:
Native:
Indian Ocean – western
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: This species is known only from the holotype and paratype. May be endemic to the region but population size is unknown.
Population Trend: Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: The holotype (female; 65.2 cm TL) and paratype (male; 79.7 cm TL) were collected by trammel net at 1,000 m depth off Alphonse Island (Baranes 2003). Appears to display sexual dimorphism in snout length and shape of the upper jaw teeth (Baranes 2003). Little else is known of the biology of the species.
Systems: Marine

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The depth distribution of the species is little known and it is highly probable that C. seychellorum has been caught by Seychellois fishermen without their knowledge that it was a new species (Anon 2005). Given the species’ apparently narrow range, the limited life history characteristics of Centrophorus species and the vulnerability of other Centrophorus species to rapid population depletion in fisheries, any bycatch is of concern. (For example, intensive trawl fishing on the slope off New South Wales, Australia, rapidly depleted stocks of similar species there (Graham et al. 2001)). Although some trial deepsea fishing has been conducted in the Seychelles to date, there are apparently no commercial fisheries targeting resources below 600 m at present (M. Isidore pers. comm. 2007).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: None in place. Like many deeper water species more information on biology, ecology and importance in fisheries are required to further assess status and any future conservation needs. Where taken, catches require monitoring, particularly as deepwater fisheries expand worldwide. A new shark monitoring log-sheet was introduced by the Seychelles Fishing Authority in August 2004 aimed at assessing the stocks of sharks fished locally and identifying the various species caught (Anon 2005).

The development and implementation of management plans (national and/or regional e.g., under the FAO International Plan of Action for the Conservation and Management of Sharks: IPOA-Sharks) are required to facilitate the conservation and management of all chondrichthyan species in the region.

Citation: McCormack, C. 2009. Centrophorus seychellorum. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 22 December 2014.
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