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Dasyatis thetidis 

Scope:Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_onStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Chondrichthyes Rajiformes Dasyatidae

Scientific Name: Dasyatis thetidis
Species Authority: Ogilby, 1899
Common Name(s):
English Black Stingray, Longtail Stingray, Thorntail Stingray

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2015
Date Assessed: 2015-05-04
Assessor(s): Stevens, J.D. & Kyne, P.M.
Reviewer(s): Walls, R.H.L. & Dulvy, N.K.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Kyne, P.M. & Walls, R.H.L.
Justification:
The Black Stingray (Dasyatis thetidis) is a large species reaching 180 cm disc width with a widespread but patchy distribution in southern Africa, southern Australia, and New Zealand. It is a bycatch of large-scale commercial fisheries in southern Australia where about a quarter of the catch is retained. Monitoring between 1998 and 2006 showed no overall trends in catch levels. In New Zealand, it is relatively common and is taken by recreational fishers and as bycatch of trawl, hook and net fisheries. No information is available regarding status in southern Africa. This species is protected from recreational fishing in Western Australia where it is valued by tourists and local communities due to its tame and inquistive nature in shallow inshore waters. That protection, stable catch trends off southern Australia and a ban on commercial targeting in New Zealand result in a Least Concern assessment. However, catch levels should continue to be monitored and information obtained to understand its status off southern Africa.
Previously published Red List assessments:
  • 2009 – Data Deficient (DD)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:The Black Stingay occurs in waters off South Africa and Mozambique (Compagno et al. 1989), southern Australia (Last and Stevens 2009), and the North Island of New Zealand (Cox and Francis 1997).
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria, Western Australia); Mozambique; New Zealand; South Africa
FAO Marine Fishing Areas:
Native:
Atlantic – southeast; Indian Ocean – eastern; Indian Ocean – western; Pacific – southwest; Pacific – western central
Additional data:
Lower depth limit (metres):440
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:A relatively common stingray in New Zealand. Given its disjunct distribution, it is expected that each location (southern Africa, Australia, New Zealand) represent distinct subpopulations.
Catch trend data from between 1998 and 2006 in the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery showed no overall trend (Walker and Gason 2007)
Current Population Trend:Stable
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:The Black Stingray is a large demersal species commonly found inshore (Last and Stevens 2009) but reported to 440 m depth (Cox and Francis 1997). This species is found on soft bottoms in estuaries, lagoons and around reefs (Compagno et al. 1989). It reaches a maximum size of at least 180 cm disc width (DW) and is free-swimming at 35 cm DW (Last and Stevens 2009). Nothing else is known of its biology.
Systems:Marine

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: The Black Stingray is retained at least in parts of southern Australia; for example, an estimated 26% of the annual catch was retained in the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery between 2000 and 2006 (Walker and Gason 2007). Elsewhere, in particular Western Australia, this species is valued by tourists and local communities due to its tame and inquistive nature in shallow inshore waters.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): This stingray is taken occasionally by recreational fishers and as bycatch of trawl, hook and net fisheries across its range, but the extent of the catch is largely unknown. Post capture survival from discarding is unknown.

Off southeastern Australia, much of the species' distribution receives high levels of fishing effort. Catch trend data from between 1998 and 2006 in the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery showed no overall trend with 74% of the estimated annual catch discarded (Walker and Gason 2007). It is also a likely bycatch of other Australian fisheries. In the Queensland East Coast Trawl Fishery juveniles are a very rare discarded bycatch, as that fishery overlaps only with the northern extent of the species' occurrence (Kyne 2008).

This species is caught in commercial trawl, bottom longline and set net fisheries in New Zealand (MPI 2013). Between 1986 and 1997 less than 15 tonnes of landings annually (combined catch with Smooth Stingray) were reported in New Zealand (Francis 1998), but this does not include unreported discards. From 2004 to 2012 combined commercial catches of stingrays (encompassing the categories 'long-tailed stingray', 'short-tailed stingray' and 'unidentified stingray') varied between 29-56 tonnes annually including discards (MPI 2013).

There is no information available on catch levels off southern Africa.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Stingrays are banned as a commercial target species in New Zealand (Francis 1998). The Black Stingray, along with the Smooth Stingray (Dasyatis brevicaudata), are protected from recreational fishing in the West Coast and South Coast Bioregions of Western Austalia where they are valued by tourists and local communities due to their tame and inquistive nature in shallow inshore waters.

Catch levels should continue to be quatified in the Australian Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery, and bycatch levels investigated elsewhere in its range.

Citation: Stevens, J.D. & Kyne, P.M. 2015. Dasyatis thetidis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2015: e.T161401A68618947. . Downloaded on 29 July 2016.
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