157492-1

Ampedus elegantulus 

Scope: Europe
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Arthropoda Insecta Coleoptera Elateridae

Scientific Name: Ampedus elegantulus (Schönherr, 1817)

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern (Regional assessment) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2009-06-05
Assessor(s): Nieto, A., Mannerkoski, I., Putchkov, A., Tykarski, P., Mason, F., Dodelin, B. & Tezcan, S.
Reviewer(s): Alexander, K. & Nieto, A.
Justification:

European regional assessment: listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, it occurs in a number of protected areas, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.


EU 27 regional assessment: listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, it occurs in a number of protected areas, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This Euro-Anatolian species occurs throughout much of Europe, in the north reaching Scandinavia (Laibner 2000). In Ukraine it is present in the Carpathians (not in the high mountains) and in the forest-steppe zone. In Spain this species is cited as present without specific localities in a check-list of Iberian Elateridae (Sánchez-Ruiz 1996); presence recently confirmed in the north of Spain (Recalde Irurzun et al. 2005). The species is considered Extinct in Denmark (2005). It is also found in Minor Asia.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Austria; Belarus; Belgium; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Croatia; Czech Republic; France (France (mainland)); Germany; Greece (Greece (mainland)); Hungary; Italy (Italy (mainland)); Latvia; Moldova; Poland; Romania; Russian Federation (Central European Russia, Kaliningrad, South European Russia); Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain (Spain (mainland)); Sweden; Switzerland; Ukraine (Ukraine (main part))
Regionally extinct:
Denmark
Additional data:
Range Map:157492-1

Population [top]

Population:A few European states hold strong populations, but it is local and rare in most. In Hungary it is widespread all over the country and it is not uncommon and the populations are strong (O. Merkl pers. comm. 2009). In the Czech Republic the species is reported from four or five areas. In the Slovak Republic there are many records from six areas; it is a localized species but its niches are rather numerous (Laibner 2000). In Spain there is a single locality known, in the Pyrenees (Recalde Irurzun et al. 2005). In France it is considered a rare species. In Italy there are five scattered records throughout the country. In Ukraine this species is relatively not rare, but local.
Current Population Trend:Stable
Additional data:

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:This is an obligate saproxylic species. The larvae develop in decayed (red-rotted) heartwood of a wide range of broad-leaved trees, but especially oak Quercus, beech Fagus, lime Tilia, and willow Salix. Pupation take place in VII-VIII; after this the beetles hibernate. The adult is active in V-VII the following year. The adult is usually found during the day sheltering under bark or in cracks of decayed wood; it flies at twilight. In Hungary this species prefers willow galleries along rivers and streams; also in alder Alnus and poplar Populus (O. Merkl pers. comm. 2009). In the Czech Republic and Slovak Republic it inhabits alluvial woodlands and vegetation near rivers in highlands and moist localities of the forest-steppe zone (Laibner 2000). It is reported to be confined to mountainous areas in the south of its range.
Systems:Terrestrial

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: Saproxylic Coleoptera tend to be popular with beetle collectors although trade is rarely an issue, the only exceptions being a few larger species of more dramatic form or colour.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s):

The main overall threat is likely to be degradation or loss of habitat quality, involving structural changes in the tree populations arising from changing land use – affecting age structures and tree density. Exploitation from forestry is often a key immediate issue, but equally damaging can be long-term changes towards canopy closure and loss of ancient trees as a result of non- or minimum-intervention management systems which all too often exclude grazing by large herbivores. Fragmentation and increasing isolation of beetle populations are also key factors. In Hungary the species is not threatened (O. Merkl pers. comm. 2009).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: The species occurs in several protected areas throughout its range (e.g. Hungary). This species is considered Regionally Extinct in Denmark (2005). In Ukraine, it may be required to create protected areas for this species. FSC Guidelines should promote conservation.

Citation: Nieto, A., Mannerkoski, I., Putchkov, A., Tykarski, P., Mason, F., Dodelin, B. & Tezcan, S. 2010. Ampedus elegantulus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2010: e.T157492A5081377. . Downloaded on 18 August 2018.
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