157491-1

Triplax russica 

Scope: Europe
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Arthropoda Insecta Coleoptera Erotylidae

Scientific Name: Triplax russica (Linnaeus, 1758)
Taxonomic Source(s): Linnaeus, C. 1758. Systema naturae per regna tria naturae, secundum classes, ordinus, genera, species, cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis. Tomus I. Editio decima, reformata. Impensis Direct, Laurentii Salvii, Holmiae.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern (Regional assessment) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2009-06-05
Assessor(s): Mannerkoski, I., Hyvärinen, E., Alexander, K., Büche, B., Mico, E. & Pettersson, R.
Reviewer(s): Alexander, K. & Nieto, A.
Justification:

European regional assessment: listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large overall population, it occurs in many protected areas, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

EU 27 regional assessment: listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large overall population, it occurs in many protected areas, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This Holarctic species is widespread across much of Europe. It is absent from Ireland. It is also found in the Caucasus, northern Africa (Algeria) and Iran.

In Britain it has a very disjunct distribution, widespread in the English lowlands and in the Caledonian forest areas of Scotland, but absent elsewhere (K.N.A. Alexander pers. comm. 2009).
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Albania; Austria; Belarus; Belgium; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Croatia; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France (Corsica, France (mainland)); Germany; Hungary; Italy (Italy (mainland), Sardegna, Sicilia); Latvia; Liechtenstein; Lithuania; Montenegro; Netherlands; Norway; Poland; Portugal (Portugal (mainland)); Romania; Russian Federation (Central European Russia, Kaliningrad, North European Russia, Northwest European Russia); Serbia (Kosovo, Serbia); Slovakia; Spain (Spain (mainland)); Sweden; Ukraine (Krym, Ukraine (main part)); United Kingdom (Great Britain)
Additional data:
Range Map:157491-1

Population [top]

Population:A widespread species that is common in many parts of its range. Population trend is stable.

In Britain there are two large populations, almost certainly genetically distinct; strong numbers in both (K.N.A. Alexander pers. comm. 2009). In Ukraine this species is common. In Hungary this species is widespread in the hilly and mountainous areas; population size and trend have not been quantified, although the species is regarded as common in its localities. In Portugal there is a single recent record from the central area, near the western Atlantic coast (Aguiar and Serrano 1995).
Current Population Trend:Stable
Additional data:

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:This is an obligate saproxylic species.

Develops in fungal fruiting bodies on various broad-leaved trees. Adults may be found feeding at bracket fungi, irrespective of larval hosts.(Alexander 2000). In Ukraine the larvae usually develop in the wood-decay fungi Inonotus obliquus and I. cuticularius;  the adult beetles may be found on Polyporus squamosus, Russula rosea, Flammulina fomentarius, Pleurotus calyptratus, but (Khalidov 1984, Nikitsky et al. 1996, Krasutzky 1996). In Britain, the larvae develop in Inonotus hispidus on ash Fraxinus in the south and east lowlands, while preferring Fomes fomentarius on birch Betula in the Caledonian forest areas of Scotland.  Also reported from other broad-leaved trees, without reference to the associated fungus  (Alexander 2000). In Hungary this species occurs almost always on Pleurotus pulmonarius.

In Hungary this species occurs in various broadleaved forests. UK sites include ancient wood pastures and woodlands, historic parklands, and traditional orchards (Alexander 2000).




Systems:Terrestrial

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: Saproxylic Coleoptera tend to be popular with beetle collectors although trade is rarely an issue, the only exceptions being a few larger species of more dramatic form or colour.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s):

There are no major threats to this species at the European scale.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: There are no conservation measures in place other than general FSC guidelines. This species occurs in many protected areas (e.g. Hungary, UK).

Citation: Mannerkoski, I., Hyvärinen, E., Alexander, K., Büche, B., Mico, E. & Pettersson, R. 2010. Triplax russica. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2010: e.T157491A5081038. . Downloaded on 22 July 2018.
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