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Haitia acuta 

Scope: Global
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Mollusca Gastropoda Hygrophila Physidae

Scientific Name: Haitia acuta (Draparnaud, 1805)
Regional Assessments:
Synonym(s):
Costatella acuta (Draparnaud, 1805)
Physa acuta Draparnaud, 1805
Physella acuta (Draparnaud, 1805)
Physella heterostropha (Say, 1817)
Taxonomic Notes: Taylor (2003) has transferred Physella acuta to the genus Haitia Clench & Aguayo, 1932. This affiliation is consequently used by Fauna Europea (Bank et al. 2006).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2017
Date Assessed: 2016-06-23
Assessor(s): Van Damme, D., Ghamizi, M., Seddon, M.B., Budha, P.B., Dutta, J. & Cordeiro, J.
Reviewer(s): Sayer, C. & Ormes, M.
Contributor(s): Soliman, G., Ward, J., Kristensen, T.K. & Stensgaard, A.-S.
Justification:

The species has a widespread Holartic distribution and has been recorded from northern America, Europe, Eurasia and Africa, as well as Asia and Oceania. The species is probably native to northeastern North America (Taylor 2003), but it has been widely introduced and its native and introduced ranges are not well understood. Its range is expanding and it is considered Least Concern.

Previously published Red List assessments:

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:The species is a widespread Holartic species that has been recorded from northern America, Europe, Eurasia and Africa. Its origin is not fully resolved. The species is probably native to northeastern North America (Taylor 2003), but it has been widely introduced and its native and introduced ranges are not well understood.

It has been recorded from several regions in Africa. Many of these records pertain, according to Brown (1994), to introduced American species. The anatomical studies of Ghamizi (1998) clearly show that Maghrebian populations belong to the synonym, P. acuta sensu stricto. In northern Africa, it is common in the Maghreb and also has been recorded from the Nile Delta (Van Damme 1984, Brown 1994). It is present all over the Nile from Lake Nasser to the Nile Delta (G. Soliman pers. comm. 2008). It is not known from Libya but it is suspected to also be in this country.

The species is widespread in Europe, where it is found in many countries including Sweden, Great Britain (UK), Channel Islands (UK), Northern Ireland (UK), Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, France (mainland and Corsica), Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Hungary, Spain (mainland, Balearic Islands, and the Canary Islands), Italy (mainland, Sardinia, Sicily), Malta, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Romania, Andorra, Portugal (mainland, Azores and Madeiran Islands), Albania, Slovenia, Croatia and Macedonia, Montenegro, Ukraine, Greece (mainland and the North Aegean Islands). It has also been reported from the former country of Yugoslavia (current country unknown). The species is also recorded from Russia (e.g., Ciscaucasia, Transcaucasia, Central Asia, Volga River delta, southern Primorje; Kantor et al. 2010).

The species has been widely introduced as it can be transported by birds, as well as by human activities. It is present in India (Assam and Maharashtra (Subba Rao 1989) and is most likely present elsewhere), Japan, and probably elsewhere in southeast Asia, and has been recorded from French Polynesia.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Canada; Saint Pierre and Miquelon; United States
Introduced:
Åland Islands; Albania; Algeria; Andorra; Angola; Austria; Belgium; Benin; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Botswana; Bulgaria; Burkina Faso; Cameroon; Cape Verde; Chad; China; Comoros; Côte d'Ivoire; Croatia; Czech Republic; Denmark; Djibouti; Egypt; Eritrea; Estonia; Ethiopia; Faroe Islands; Finland; France; French Polynesia (Society Is.); Gabon; Gambia; Germany; Ghana; Gibraltar; Greece; Greenland; Guernsey; Guinea; Guinea-Bissau; Holy See (Vatican City State); Hong Kong; Hungary; Iceland; India (Assam, Maharashtra); Ireland; Isle of Man; Italy; Japan; Jersey; Kenya; Latvia; Lesotho; Liberia; Liechtenstein; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of; Madagascar; Malta; Mayotte; Monaco; Montenegro; Morocco; Namibia; Netherlands; Niger; Norway; Pakistan; Poland; Portugal; Réunion; Romania; Russian Federation (Chechnya, Dagestan, Ingushetiya, Kabardino-Balkariya, Karachaevo-Cherkessiya, Krasnodar, Primoryi, Severo-Osetiya, Stavropol); Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha; San Marino; Sao Tomé and Principe; Senegal; Serbia; Seychelles; Slovakia; Slovenia; Somalia; South Africa; Spain; Sudan; Svalbard and Jan Mayen; Sweden; Switzerland; Tanzania, United Republic of; Togo; Tunisia; Uganda; United Kingdom; Western Sahara; Zambia; Zimbabwe
Additional data:
Continuing decline in area of occupancy (AOO):Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in area of occupancy (AOO):UnknownEstimated extent of occurrence (EOO) - km2:
Continuing decline in extent of occurrence (EOO):UnknownExtreme fluctuations in extent of occurrence (EOO):Unknown
Continuing decline in number of locations:Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in the number of locations:Unknown
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:

Global population data are not available, however the species' range is expanding.

Though this species has only very recently been recorded from India (Pune, Maharashtra), the large number of examples collected suggest its abundant occurrence in river Yamuna at Delhi.

Current Population Trend:Increasing
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:The species is found in a wide range of natural and anthropogenic water types, including polluted water. It also occurs commonly in irrigation channels, dams and streams in or near towns and may be well adapted to undergo anhydrobiosis.

The species has been widely introduced as it can be transported by birds, as well as by human activities.
Systems:Freshwater
Continuing decline in area, extent and/or quality of habitat:Unknown

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade:

This species is not in use or in trade.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The species is not under threat.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions:

No conservation actions are required for this species, however the natural range of the species not well understood and this requires additional research.


Citation: Van Damme, D., Ghamizi, M., Seddon, M.B., Budha, P.B., Dutta, J. & Cordeiro, J. 2017. Haitia acuta. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2017: e.T155538A91354457. . Downloaded on 14 December 2017.
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