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Cambarellus montezumae

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA ARTHROPODA MALACOSTRACA DECAPODA CAMBARIDAE

Scientific Name: Cambarellus montezumae
Species Authority: Saussure, 1857
Taxonomic Notes: This species is thought to be part of a species complex (M.  López-Mejía., F. Alvarez. and C. Pedraza-Lara pers. comm. 2009).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2010-06-01
Assessor(s): Alvarez, F., López-Mejía, M. & Pedraza Lara, C.
Reviewer(s): Collen, B. & Richman, N.
Contributor(s): Livingston, F., Livingston, F., Soulsby, A.-M., Batchelor, A., Dyer, E., Whitton, F., Milligan, H.T., Smith, J., Lutz, M.L., De Silva, R., McGuinness, S., Kasthala, G., Jopling, B., Sullivan, K. & Cryer, G.
Justification:

Cambarellus montezumae has been assessed as Least Concern.  This species has a relatively wide distribution across Mexico and is found in a variety of habitat types. It is abundant in at least some parts of its range and although the introduction of Common Carp for aquaculture may be causing some localized declines, at present this is not thought to represent a major threat to this species.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species has a relatively wide distribution across Mexico (Alvarez and Rangel 2007). It is found from Lake Chapala in Jalisco, east towards the crater lakes of Puebla (Alvarez and Rangel 2007).
Countries:
Native:
Mexico (Jalisco, Puebla)
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: In the canals of Xochimilco, near Mexico City, this species is abundant and is the dominant native invertebrate. It is regularly fished at a subsistence level for human consumption (Alvarez and Rangel 2007), but there is no evidence that this is having a significant adverse effect on the overall population size and status.

A reduction in the abundance of this species has been observed in shallow ponds within which Cyprinus carpio have been introduced (Hinojosa-Garro and Zambrano 2004), which is likely to be as a result of carp increasing the turbidity of the water and thereby reducing the amount of light available to submerged macrophytes on which the crayfish are dependent for food and shelter (Hinojosa-Garro and Zambrano 2004). Although carp introductions may be causing localized declines in some areas, given the wide distribution of this species and its ability to utilize a wide range of habitat types, this is not considered to pose a major threat to the entire population (M. López-Mejía., F. Alvarez. and C. Pedraza-Lara pers. comm. 2009).

Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species inhabits rivers, lakes, reservoirs and canal banks, and is associated with the roots of riparian vegetation, up to a depth of 0.5 m. It feeds on a wide variety of organisms, including macrophytes, and is predated upon by vertebrates.  Furthermore, it is a burrowing species and berried females can be found between October and March. Each female will produce between 12-120 eggs. In addition, temperature, pH and oxygen concentrations are not thought to have a significant effect on the abundance of this species, and it has been found at oxygen concentrations of 5 to 7.5 mg L-1, at a pH range of 7.6-9 and at temperatures of 10-25 °C, though only rarely above 20 °C (Alvarez and Rangel 2007). It has also been described as a physiologically tolerant species (M. López-Mejía., F. Alvarez. and C. Pedraza-Lara pers. comm. 2009).
Systems: Freshwater

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This species is regularly fished at a subsistence level for human consumption (Alvarez and Rangel 2007), but there is no evidence that this is having an adverse effect on the overall population size.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): This species is regularly fished at a subsistence level for human consumption (Alvarez and Rangel 2007), but there is no evidence that this is having an adverse effect on the overall population size.  The introduction of the Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) for aquaculture, may however pose a threat to this species (Hinojosa-Garro and Zambrano 2004). A reduction in the abundance of this species has been observed in shallow ponds within which carp have been introduced, which is likely to be as a result of the carp increasing the turbidity of the water and thereby reducing the amount of light available to submerged macrophytes on which the crayfish are dependent for food and shelter (Hinojosa-Garro and Zambrano 2004). Although carp introductions may be causing localized declines in some areas, given the wide distribution of this species and its ability to utilize a wide range of habitat types, this is not considered to pose a major threat to the entire population.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: There are no species-specific conservation measures in place for this species.

Citation: Alvarez, F., López-Mejía, M. & Pedraza Lara, C. 2010. Cambarellus montezumae. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 01 October 2014.
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