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Obovaria olivaria

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA MOLLUSCA BIVALVIA UNIONOIDA UNIONIDAE

Scientific Name: Obovaria olivaria
Species Authority: (Rafinesque, 1820)
Common Name(s):
English Hickorynut
Taxonomic Notes: A list of synonyms for this species can be found on The MUSSEL project web site (Graf and Cummings 2011).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2012
Date Assessed: 2012-03-12
Assessor(s): Cummings, K. & Cordeiro, J.
Reviewer(s): Bohm, M., Seddon, M. & Collen, B.
Contributor(s): Dyer, E., Whitton, F., Soulsby, A.-M., Kasthala, G., McGuinness, S., Milligan, HT, De Silva, R., Herdson, R., Thorley, J., Collins, A., McMillan, K., Duncan, C., Offord, S. & Richman, N.
Justification:
Obovaria olivaria has been assessed as Least Concern due to its wide distribution. Although it has a very wide range and is considered stable throughout portions of its range, it is probably extirpated from Alabama, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Nebraska, Kansas, the Tennessee River, and the Detroit River between Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie, Michigan/Ontario (the latter due to Zebra Mussel invasion). However, population declines are not thought to be sufficient for inclusion in a threatened or Near Threatened category. However, documentation of extirpation due to the invasive Zebra Mussel makes this a serious enough threat to warrant further research regarding population trends and future surveys, in order to monitor the status of this species, prompt uplisting of the species if population declines worsen and implement effective conservation measures if necessary.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is found throughout most of the Mississippi River drainage, from Pennsylvania and New York to Minnesota and Kansas, south to Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana. It is also found in the St. Lawrence River basin from Lake Ontario to Quebec (Parmalee and Bogan 1998). It is probably extirpated from Alabama (Mirarchi et al. 2004), Kansas (Couch 1997), Nebraska (Hoke 2005), Pennsylvania (Bogan 1993), Ohio (Watters 1995), and possibly the Tennessee River (Parmalee and Bogan 1998). In Canada, it occurs in a small number of rivers in eastern Ontario and southern Quebec (Martel and Picard 2005). Recently this species has been confirmed to be probably extirpated from the main channel of the Detroit River between Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie, Michigan/Ontario, due to Zebra Mussel invasion (Schloesser et al. 2006).
Countries:
Native:
Canada (Ontario, Québec); United States (Alabama - Possibly Extinct, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas - Possibly Extinct, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska - Possibly Extinct, New York - Possibly Extinct, Ohio, Pennsylvania - Possibly Extinct, Tennessee, West Virginia - Possibly Extinct, Wisconsin)
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: There are no specific population data available. Although this species has a very wide range and is considered stable throughout portions of its range, it is probably extirpated from Alabama, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Nebraska, Kansas, the Tennessee River, and the Detroit River between Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie, Michigan/Ontario (the latter due to Zebra Mussel invasion). In Canada, it only occurs in a small number of rivers in eastern Ontario and southern Quebec.
Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species is typically found on sand or gravel substrates in deep water, depths usually exceeding six to eight feet, with good current. In large rivers it is often found in the large mussel beds in gravel bars in midriver (Parmalee and Bogan 1998).
Systems: Freshwater

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This species is not utilized.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Although it has a very wide range and is considered stable throughout portions of its range, it is probably extirpated from a number of states, and in one case this is thought to be due to Zebra Mussel invasion.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: There are no species-specific conservation measures in place. Further research regarding the population trends of this species in conjunction with future surveys will ensure that this species is adequately monitored.

Citation: Cummings, K. & Cordeiro, J. 2012. Obovaria olivaria. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 19 December 2014.
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