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Notomys amplus 

Scope:Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_on

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Rodentia Muridae

Scientific Name: Notomys amplus
Species Authority: Brazenor, 1936
Common Name(s):
English Short-tailed Hopping-mouse
French Souris sauteuse
Spanish Ratones Saltadores de Australia

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Extinct ver 3.1
Year Published: 2016
Date Assessed: 2012-12-31
Assessor(s): Burbidge, A.A. & Woinarski, J.
Reviewer(s): Amori, G.
Contributor(s): Baynes, A., Dixon, J. & Flannery, T.
Justification:
Listed as Extinct because this species has not been recorded since 1896.
Previously published Red List assessments:
  • 2008 – Extinct (EX)
  • 1996 – Extinct (EX)
  • 1994 – Extinct (Ex)
  • 1990 – Extinct (Ex)
  • 1988 – Extinct (Ex)
  • 1986 – Extinct (EX)
  • 1982 – Extinct (Ex)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:

The only known specimens came from Charlotte Waters in 1896. Subfossil data, summarised in Baynes and Jones (1993), Dixon (2008) and Burbidge et al. (2009), indicate that it had a wide distribution in the central and western arid zone, ranging from north-eastern South Australia and south-eastern Northern Territory to North West Cape, Western Australia.

Countries occurrence:
Regionally extinct:
Australia (Northern Territory, South Australia, Western Australia)
Additional data:
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:The species is extinct.
Additional data:

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:

The presence of its remains in a deposit in the Great Sandy Desert suggests that the species inhabited sand dunes and sand plains (A. Baynes pers. comm.). There appears to have been ecological separation by habitat substrate between the Short-tailed Hopping-mouse and the Long-tailed Hopping-mouse N. longicaudatus, which inhabited more clay-rich substrates, as noted by John Gilbert when he first found the Long-tailed Hopping-mouse at Moore River, Western Australia.

Systems:Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The reasons for the loss of this species are unknown, but may be related to predation by introduced species such as foxes and feral cats.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: The species is extinct.

Citation: Burbidge, A.A. & Woinarski, J. 2016. Notomys amplus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T14861A22401450. . Downloaded on 28 July 2016.
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