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Aotus jorgehernandezi

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA MAMMALIA PRIMATES AOTIDAE

Scientific Name: Aotus jorgehernandezi
Species Authority: Defler & Bueno, 2007
Common Name(s):
English Hernández-camacho’s Night Monkey
Taxonomic Notes: Defler and Bueno (2007) described A. jorgehernandezi from a specimen in captivity in Quindío Department, Colombia, said to be from the Parque de los Nevados on the border between Quindío and Risaralda. The authors also discuss the karyology of the grey-necked night monkeys and reaffirm the validity of A. brumbacki, A. griseimembra, A. lemurinus, A. trivirgatus, A. vociferans and A. zonalis.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Data Deficient ver 3.1
Year Published: 2008
Date Assessed: 2008-06-30
Assessor(s): Morales-Jiménez, A.L. & Link, A.
Reviewer(s): Mittermeier, R.A. & Rylands, A.B. (Primate Red List Authority)
Justification:
This species is listed as Data Deficient as it is was recently described, is currently known only from the type locality, and there is no information on the species' population status or major threats. As more information becomes available, it will be necessary to reassess the species.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: The precise geographic range of this species is not known. It is believed to occur on the western slopes and foothills of the Andes in the region of Quindío and Riseralda. This being so it would occur in areas currently assigned to A. zonalis.
Countries:
Native:
Colombia (Colombia (mainland))
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: No information available. Known only from type locality. Aquino and Encarnación (1994b) reviewed population structure and densities for the genus.
Population Trend: Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: Submontane and possibly montane tropical forest, western slopes of the Cordillera Occidental. Aquino and Encarnación (1994b) reviewed the habitat and forest preferences of the genus.

Night monkeys are nocturnal: they are most active at dawn and dusk. The only exception is Aotus azarae azarae of the Chaco of southern Bolivia, Paraguay and Argentina, which is cathemeral (active during night and day). They are frugivorous; their diet includes fruit, nectar and flower (seasonally important for the A. a. azarae in the Chaco), leaves, and small animals prey such as insects (Wright 1989; Fernandez-Duque 2007).

They are socially monogamous, living in small groups of an adult pair and offspring of different ages (infant, one or two juveniles and sometimes a subadult. In A. a. azarae, a significant number of adults range alone. They may be subadults that have left their natal groups or older adults which have been evicted from their groups by competitors (Fernandez-Duque and Huntington 2002; Fernandez-Duque 2004). Both sexes disperse. Males care for the infants (carry them) (Rotundo et al, 2002, 2005). Lone adults were observed by Villavicencio Galindo (2003) in northern Colombia. Night monkeys are territorial—groups occupy overlapping territories of 5-18 ha (depending on the species and location) (Wright 1978; Fernandez-Duque 2007). Wright (1994) and Fernandez-Duque (2007) review the behaviour and ecology of the genus.

Captive male A. lemurinus reach sexual maturity when 2 years old, and captive female A. vociferans and A. nancymaae first breed when 3-4 years old (Dixson 1983; Fernandez-Duque 2007). In the wild, male A. azarae reach adult weight only when about 4 years old, and age at first reproduction is about 5 years of age (Juárez et al. 2003; Fernandez-Duque 2004). A female A. azaraewas found to breed for the first time at 58 months of age (Fernandez-Duque et al. 2002). Single offspring are the rule. Wright (1985) recorded births between August and February for A. nigriceps in Peru (Manu National Park), and Aquino et al. (1990) indicated a birth season between December and March) for A. nancymaae in north-eastern Peru. In the Argentinean Chaco, A. azarae shows a peak of births between March and June (Fernandez-Duque 2007).
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The major threats to this species are not known.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species may occur in Tatamá Natural National Park.
It is listed on CITES Appendix II.

Citation: Morales-Jiménez, A.L. & Link, A. 2008. Aotus jorgehernandezi. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 23 October 2014.
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