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Mirza coquereli

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA MAMMALIA PRIMATES CHEIROGALEIDAE

Scientific Name: Mirza coquereli
Species Authority: (A. Grandidier, 1867)
Common Name/s:
English Coquerel's Giant Mouse Lemur, Coquerel's Dwarf Lemur, Coquerel's Mouse-lemur
Taxonomic Notes: Recent analyses of morphometric, genetic, and behavioral data has now resulted in the recognition of a second species of Mirza. M. coquereli is the larger of the two, with a distribution nucleus in southwestern Madagascar, while the newly described, smaller-bodied Mirza zaza is found in the Sambirano region of the far northwest (Kappeler et al. 2005).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened ver 3.1
Year Published: 2008
Date Assessed: 2008-06-30
Assessor/s: Andrainarivo, C., Andriaholinirina, V.N., Feistner, A., Felix, T., Ganzhorn, J., Garbutt, N., Golden, C., Konstant, B., Louis Jr., E., Meyers, D., Mittermeier, R.A., Perieras, A., Princee, F., Rabarivola, J.C., Rakotosamimanana, B., Rasamimanana, H., Ratsimbazafy, J., Raveloarinoro, G., Razafimanantsoa, A., Roos, C., Rumpler, Y., Schwitzer, C., Thalmann, U., Wilmé, L. & Wright, P.
Reviewer/s: Mittermeier, R.A. & Rylands, A.B. (Primate Red List Authority)
Justification:
Listed as Near Threatened as the species is thought to have undergone a reduction of 20-25% over the past 15 years (assuming a generation length of 5 years) due primarily to a decline in area and quality of habitat within the known range of the species. Almost qualifies as threatened under criterion A2c.
History:
2000 Vulnerable
1996 Vulnerable
1994 Vulnerable (Groombridge 1994)
1990 Vulnerable (IUCN 1990)
1990 Vulnerable (IUCN 1990)
1988 Rare (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
1986 Insufficiently Known (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1986)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Coquerel’s Giant Mouse Lemur is found in lowland dry forests of western Madagascar, from sea level to 700 m. One nucleus is in the south-west between the Onilahy River to the south and the Tsiribinha River to the north, including Vohibasia and Zombitse National Parks and Isalo National Park. To the north of the Tsiribihina River, it has also been reported from the the Andranomena Special Reserve and Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park, and recent sightings confirm its presence in Tsingy de Namoroka National Park and in the region of Sahamalaza (see Mittermeier et al. 2008 and references therein). Farther north, the newly described M. zaza inhabits the Sambirano region
Countries:
Native:
Madagascar
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: Population densities reported from Marosalaza range from 30 to 50 individuals/km² but, in the latter study, reached as high as 210 individuals/km² in forests running along rivers (see Mittermeier et al. 2008 and references therein). In Kirindy, Kappeler (1997) recorded 120 individuals/km², but the population underwent an inexplicable decline after being steady for several years.
Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species inhabits dry deciduous forest, and is found near rivers and ponds in dense forest. M. coquereli is adaptable and can survive in secondary forest. The species is typically solitary, choosing to forage alone, but tends to nest communally; it spends daytime hours in a spherical nest of up to one-half meter in diameter, usually placed 2-10 m high in the fork of a large branch or among dense lianas. Reproductive activity of M. coquereli in the Kirindy Forest begins in November. Gestation lasts about three months and two infants (occasionally one) leave the nest after about three weeks (see Mittermeier et al. 2008 and references therein).
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Although this species occurs in fairly high densities in some parts of its range, its western dry deciduous forest habitat is becoming increasingly fragmented where habitat loss has been marked due to slash-and-burn agriculture and charcoal production, and it may be taken for food in some parts of its range in western Madagascar.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species is listed on Appendix I of CITES. This species is believed to be present in five national parks (Isalo, Tsingy de Bemaraha, Tsingy de Namaoroka, Vohibasia, and Zombitse), the Tsingy de Bemaraha Strict Nature Reserve, the Andranomena Special Reserve, the Analabe Private Reserve, the Kirindy Forest (now Kirindy-Mitea National Park), and the Ampataka Classified Forest (Mittermeier et al. 2008).
Citation: Andrainarivo, C., Andriaholinirina, V.N., Feistner, A., Felix, T., Ganzhorn, J., Garbutt, N., Golden, C., Konstant, B., Louis Jr., E., Meyers, D., Mittermeier, R.A., Perieras, A., Princee, F., Rabarivola, J.C., Rakotosamimanana, B., Rasamimanana, H., Ratsimbazafy, J., Raveloarinoro, G., Razafimanantsoa, A., Roos, C., Rumpler, Y., Schwitzer, C., Thalmann, U., Wilmé, L. & Wright, P. 2008. Mirza coquereli. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 19 April 2014.
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