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Liberiictis kuhni

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA MAMMALIA CARNIVORA HERPESTIDAE

Scientific Name: Liberiictis kuhni
Species Authority: Hayman, 1958
Common Name(s):
English Liberian Mongoose

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Vulnerable A2cd ver 3.1
Year Published: 2012
Date Assessed: 2008-07-01
Assessor(s): Dunham, A. & Gaubert, P.
Reviewer(s): Duckworth , J.W. & Hoffmann, M.
Justification:
Listed as Vulnerable as the species is believed to have undergone a decline of around 30% over the last 15 years (assuming a generation length of 5 years) based on the loss of habitat within its range in the upper Guinea forests, coupled with the impacts of hunting.
History:
1996 Endangered
1994 Endangered (Groombridge 1994)
1990 Endangered (IUCN 1990)
1988 Endangered (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Known only from north-eastern Liberia and western Côte d’Ivoire. They are likely to occur in suitable habitat in S. Guinea (Taylor and Dunham in press).
Countries:
Native:
Côte d'Ivoire; Liberia
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: Reliable information on their population status is not available (the first live specimen was only taken in 1989 from Nimbo When), but they are declining in many areas. Populations in Taï N.P. estimated at approximately 1.5/km² (Taylor and Dunham in press).
Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: Occurs in primary and secondary forests, and are found mainly in swamp forest and streambeds with deep sandy soils where earthworms are abundant. Although present in secondary forests, the lack of den sites may restrict their distribution (Taylor and Dunham in press).
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Threats include habitat loss from agriculture, logging and mining, and hunting with dogs, shotguns, and snares. They may also be vulnerable to the use of pesticides in forest plantations, as worms are known to accumulate toxins at levels dangerous to mammalian predators (Taylor and Dunham in press).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: They are known to be present in Tai National Park, and camera-trap evidence has confirmed their presence in Sapo National Park in Liberia (FDA/FFI/ZSL pers. comm. 2011).

Citation: Dunham, A. & Gaubert, P. 2012. Liberiictis kuhni. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 21 August 2014.
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