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Garrulax mitratus 

Scope: Global
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Aves Passeriformes Leiotrichidae

Scientific Name: Garrulax mitratus (Müller, 1835)
Common Name(s):
English Chestnut-capped Laughingthrush
Taxonomic Source(s): del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A., Fishpool, L.D.C., Boesman, P. and Kirwan, G.M. 2016. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 2: Passerines. Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.
Taxonomic Notes:

Garrulax mitratus and G. treacheri (del Hoyo and Collar 2016) were previously lumped as G. mitratus following Sibley and Monroe (1990, 1993).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened ver 3.1
Year Published: 2017
Date Assessed: 2017-10-01
Assessor(s): BirdLife International
Reviewer(s): Symes, A.
Contributor(s): Chng, S., Ding Li, Y. & Owen, A.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Butchart, S., Ekstrom, J., Khwaja, N., Symes, A., Martin, R
Justification:
This species has been uplisted to Near Threatened following evidence that demand for the cagebird trade is now is suspected to be driving a moderately rapid to rapid decline on Sumatra within the most recent three generations. Although the population in Thailand /Malaysia is not subject to the same threat, a moderately rapid population decline is nevertheless suspected to be taking place overall.
Previously published Red List assessments:

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species occurs from extreme southern Thailand through peninsular Malaysia, and on Sumatra (Indonesia).
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Indonesia; Malaysia; Thailand
Additional data:
Continuing decline in area of occupancy (AOO):Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in area of occupancy (AOO):NoEstimated extent of occurrence (EOO) - km2:651000
Continuing decline in extent of occurrence (EOO):UnknownExtreme fluctuations in extent of occurrence (EOO):No
Continuing decline in number of locations:Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in the number of locations:NoLower elevation limit (metres):900
Upper elevation limit (metres):3200
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:The global population size has not been quantified, but the species is generally described as common (del Hoyo et al. 2007).

Trend Justification:  The population was suspected to be in slow decline owing to ongoing habitat destruction and fragmentation, but demand for the cagebird trade is now is suspected to be driving a moderately rapid to rapid decline on Sumatra within the most recent three generations. Although the Thailand/Malaysia population is not subject to the same threat, a moderately rapid population decline is nevertheless suspected to be taking place overall.
Current Population Trend:Decreasing
Additional data:
Number of mature individuals:UnknownContinuing decline of mature individuals:Yes
Extreme fluctuations:NoPopulation severely fragmented:No
Continuing decline in subpopulations:Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in subpopulations:NoAll individuals in one subpopulation:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:It inhabits broadleaved evergreen forest, forest edge, disturbed and secondary forests and adjoining cultivation, and low growth in old rice fields, generally at 900–3200 m but locally down to 500 m in Sumatra (Collar and Robson 2017).
Systems:Terrestrial
Continuing decline in area, extent and/or quality of habitat:Unknown
Generation Length (years):4.7
Movement patterns:Not a Migrant

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): It has recently been identified as being highly sensitive to trapping for the Indonesian cagebird trade. Field surveys carried out in montane forests in northern Sumatra failed to find the species where trappers indicate that it previously occurred (Harris et al. 2016). It is the commonest Indonesian laughingthrush to be traded in Pramuka bird market in Jakarta, where 80-100 individuals were seen during visits in 2015, 2016 and 2017, potentially indicating that harvesting of this species from the wild is not sustainable and populations may soon crash (A. Owen in litt. 2017). In peninsular Malaysia it remains one of the commonest birds at its preferred elevation, which is currently little affected by logging due to prioritisation of Malaysia’s Central Forest Spine for large mammal conservation, however it may be affected by climate-related shifts in the future (Ding Li Yong in litt. 2017).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Conservation and research actions underway
It occurs in several protected areas including Taman Negara National Park in peninsular Malaysia and Gunung Leuser National Park in Sumatra.

Conservation and research actions needed.
Enforcement of national law restricting trade to species with quotas and compliance with quotas is required. Research to understand species density responses of passerine birds to trapping.

Citation: BirdLife International. 2017. Garrulax mitratus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2017: e.T103872287A118900980. . Downloaded on 18 January 2018.
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