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Acrocephalus luscinius 

Scope: Global
Language: English
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_on

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Aves Passeriformes Acrocephalidae

Scientific Name: Acrocephalus luscinius
Species Authority: (Quoy & Gaimard, 1830)
Common Name(s):
English Guam Reed-warbler, Nightingale Reed-warbler
Taxonomic Source(s): del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A., Fishpool, L.D.C., Boesman, P. and Kirwan, G.M. 2016. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 2: Passerines. Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.
Identification information: 18 cm. Large, lanky, scruffy-looking warbler with long bill and often dishevelled feathers and erect head feathers when singing. Dingy olive-yellow above, with dull yellow eyebrow and underparts. Voice Call a loud distinctive chuck or tchack. Males sing long, loud, varied and complex song. Hints Skulks in dense thickets, more often heard than seen. Male most often sings from exposed perches.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Extinct ver 3.1
Year Published: 2016
Date Assessed: 2016-10-01
Assessor(s): BirdLife International
Reviewer(s): Butchart, S. & Symes, A.
Contributor(s): Camp, R., Dutson, G., Freifeld, H., Saunders, A., Radley, P., Mosher, S., Amidon, F. & Gourley, J.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Benstead, P., Bird, J., Calvert, R., Khwaja, N., Mahood, S., O'Brien, A., Stattersfield, A., Derhé, M., Symes, A., Wright, L, Martin, R
Justification:
This species qualifies as Extinct because of a very rapid rate of decline in its very small global population observed over the past three generations.  It is likely that the introduced Brown Tree Snake Boiga irregularis delivered the final blow to the species following significant habitat loss from wetland drainage and increased frequency in fires, potential impacts from pesticides and impacts of a variety of additional introduced species (Reichel et al.1992, Kennerley and Pearson 2010).

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species is historically known from Guam (to USA).

Countries occurrence:
Regionally extinct:
Guam
Additional data:
Continuing decline in area of occupancy (AOO):Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in area of occupancy (AOO):UnknownEstimated extent of occurrence (EOO) - km2:
Continuing decline in extent of occurrence (EOO):UnknownExtreme fluctuations in extent of occurrence (EOO):Unknown
Continuing decline in number of locations:Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in the number of locations:Unknown
Upper elevation limit (metres):500
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:The last confirmed sighting of this species was made in 1969, having been said to still be ‘fairly common’ in parts of the Agana Swamp in 1967 or 1968 before rapidly disappearing from this, the species’ last site (Reichel et al. 1992). As with A. yamashinae the species was primarily restricted to wetland habitats, which suffered considerable disturbance (Reichel et al. 1992). It is likely that the introduced Brown Tree Snake Boiga irregularis delivered the final blow to the species following significant habitat loss from drainage and fires, potential impacts from pesticides and impacts of a variety of additional introduced species (Reichel et al. 1992, Kennerley and Pearson 2010).

Trend Justification:  

Additional data:
Continuing decline of mature individuals:Unknown
Extreme fluctuations:NoPopulation severely fragmented:Unknown
Continuing decline in subpopulations:Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in subpopulations:NoAll individuals in one subpopulation:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:Acrocephalus luscinius was almost exclusively found in freshwater wetland and wetland edge vegetation (Engbring et al. 1982, Reichel et al. 1992, USFWS 1998).

Systems:Terrestrial; Freshwater
Continuing decline in area, extent and/or quality of habitat:Unknown
Generation Length (years):5.7
Movement patterns:Not a Migrant

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Several factors in combination are likely to have caused the species's extirpation, including wetland destruction, predation by the introduced Brown Tree Snake (Boiga irregularis), pesticide-use and major fires.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions:

Errata [top]

Errata reason: Correct a grammatical error in the in text reference "(Reichel et al.1992)" so that it now correctly reads  "(Reichel et al. 1992)".

Citation: BirdLife International. 2016. Acrocephalus luscinius. (errata version published in 2017) The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T103780078A110024967. . Downloaded on 22 July 2017.
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