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Cranioleuca marcapatae 

Scope: Global
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Aves Passeriformes Furnariidae

Scientific Name: Cranioleuca marcapatae Zimmer, 1935
Common Name(s):
English Marcapata Spinetail
Taxonomic Source(s): del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A., Fishpool, L.D.C., Boesman, P. and Kirwan, G.M. 2016. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Volume 2: Passerines. Lynx Edicions and BirdLife International, Barcelona, Spain and Cambridge, UK.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Vulnerable A4c ver 3.1
Year Published: 2016
Date Assessed: 2016-10-01
Assessor(s): BirdLife International
Reviewer(s): Butchart, S. & Symes, A.
Contributor(s): Lees, A.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Butchart, S., Ekstrom, J., Khwaja, N., Symes, A., Sharpe, C J & Taylor, J.
Justification:

Based on a model of deforestation in the Amazon basin, and its dependence on primary forest, it is suspected that the population of this species is declining rapidly over three generations, and it has therefore been classified as Vulnerable.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:Cranioleuca marcapatae is endemic to Cuzco, Peru, where it is present in the Machu Picchu Historical Sanctuary in the Vilcanota and Carabaya ranges (Remsen and Sharpe 2016). It is generally uncommon (del Hoyo et al. 2003) to fairly common (Remsen and Sharpe 2016).
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Peru
Additional data:
Continuing decline in area of occupancy (AOO):Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in area of occupancy (AOO):NoEstimated extent of occurrence (EOO) - km2:25200
Continuing decline in extent of occurrence (EOO):UnknownExtreme fluctuations in extent of occurrence (EOO):No
Continuing decline in number of locations:Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in the number of locations:NoLower elevation limit (metres):2400
Upper elevation limit (metres):3500
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:The global population size has not been quantified, but is likely to be relatively small (Remsen and Sharpe 2016).

Trend Justification:  This species is suspected to lose more than 21% of suitable habitat within its distribution over three generations (11 years) based on a model of Amazonian deforestation (Soares-Filho et al. 2006, Bird et al. 2011). Given the susceptibility of the species to fragmentation and/or edge effects, it is therefore suspected to decline by ≥30% over three generations.
Current Population Trend:Decreasing
Additional data:
Number of mature individuals:UnknownContinuing decline of mature individuals:Yes
Extreme fluctuations:NoPopulation severely fragmented:No
Continuing decline in subpopulations:Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in subpopulations:NoAll individuals in one subpopulation:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:This is a species of humid montane and elfin forest from 2,400-3,500 m, often found in Chusquea bamboo. It feeds on arthropods. A nest thought to be of this species was oval in shape, made from moss, bark and twigs and suspended from the edge of a branch 9 m from the ground. Fledglings have been recorded in December, April and May (del Hoyo et al. 2003, Remsen and Sharpe 2016).
Systems:Terrestrial
Continuing decline in area, extent and/or quality of habitat:Unknown
Generation Length (years):3.8
Movement patterns:Not a Migrant

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The primary threat to this species is accelerating deforestation; it is thought to be particularly susceptible to fragmentation and edge effects (Soares-Filho et al. 2006, Bird et al. 2011, A. Lees in litt. 2011).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions:

Conservation Actions Underway
Occurs in Machu Picchu Historical Sanctuary and Manu Biosphere Reserve (Remsen and Sharpe 2016).

Conservation Actions Proposed

Expand the protected area network to effectively protect IBAs. Effectively resource and manage existing and new protected areas, utilising emerging opportunities to finance protected area management with the joint aims of reducing carbon emissions and maximizing biodiversity conservation. Conservation on private lands, through expanding market pressures for sound land management and preventing forest clearance on lands unsuitable for agriculture, is also essential (Soares-Filho et al. 2006).


Citation: BirdLife International. 2016. Cranioleuca marcapatae. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T103674421A93875538. . Downloaded on 15 October 2018.
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